Chickens planning a revolution..

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Alsosusieq2, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    WOW.....you know all about it.... amazing...
     
  2. OldGreyMare

    OldGreyMare Senior Member

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    Sarcasm is strong in you....I am amazed at your skill...how about telling me about battery hens in England?

    Yes Mooselady, I GREW UP in a farming family....so I think I know about it...
     
  3. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    This is one of the reasons I sold all of my guinneas. I raise turkeys. When the guinneas started attacking my turkeys, the turkeys took matters into their own hands. I wound up with dead guinneas.

    The other reason I sold them is I got sick and tired of all the noise they made...all...night...long. Never shut up!
     
  4. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    I could tell you more about organic milk production, small scale pig farming, or arable farming....maybe some sheep...see I was involved in them in the UK....can't tell you about battery farming was only in one egg farm.

    See I am a farmer, or was until last spring, and I am just amazed that someone can claim to know ALL ABOUT farming, it is a massive subject. For instance my son manages a 100,000 bird unit, raising 'artificially incubated' - is that a bad thing, many many eggs are not incubated by hens - chicks. They arrive at a a few hours old, then you set about raising them to grow as much as possible in their horribly short lives... BUT how much time have you spent actually working in that environment? How much do you know hands on......or how much do you believe of what you read?

    The article you quote is the worst case if everything...

    No his birds aren't slaughtered at 42 days, more like 32 days....and your point is? None of our food stuff dies of old age, any meat we eat does not get to have a long life span.

    The birds do live on straw floors, which are cleaned our between each batch, in the meantime it is a constant struggle to keep the food, water and air quality as optimum as we can. Hubby and I baby sat the place for two weeks at the start if the last cycle, it is a huge strain and worry making sure that the little things live.

    Out catchers all come at the dead of night, it is least stressful for the birds when it is dark, you get less injuries, and my son stays up to watch them at work and make sure that they are handled as humanely as possible. The catch and kill time are linked together, so the birds from his farm have a 2 hour dive to the factory. I cannot speak for conditions there, I have not visited.

    Yes there are losses, when you are working with those numbers there are going to be, but last cycle the losses were 2% in one barn, and a huge 3.5% in the worst one.

    The stocking rates here are strictly controlled, and they are based on the space the birds will have when they are at their biggest....so for most of their lives they have a lot of space.

    IMG_0302.JPG


    I'm not going any further, there is little point....it IS factory farming, the birds maybe genetically modified, heck most things are....yes there are losses, when you have that many birds you are going to have losses. On the other hand how do you economically feed a huge population, without some sort of factory farming? While it is great to believe that everything can live in back yards, sometimes we have to do the best we can to ensure that the people are fed, with least stress on our livestock.

    But as you know all about it, you will already know what it is like to be a chicken raiser in a place where it is below freezing half the year...
     
  5. OldGreyMare

    OldGreyMare Senior Member

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    You really got a chip on your shoulder don't you? [Name calling removed by mod]

    As for being below freezing half the year, not my personal choice to live there...they chose to live there.

    How about those modified chickens who's short lives are filled with growing so fast they fall over? Anyone who has had cornish hens they raise know they WILL fall over as they grow so fast. We (said in general terms in case you wish to question that as well) want our food quickly, we want it now. That is why so many layer hens die younger than normal...they get ovarian cancers, they get egg bound from being too young to properly support laying early, their bodies aren't done growing.

    Even the backyard hens that I and others keep have many issues...no I don't know them all, but when I have taken my hens in for a necropsy when they die, to ensure it isn't anything I need to be concerned about that may harm my flock, the vet and I have talked about how chickens are modified so much and their life...it sucks when it is a large scale operation.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 17, 2018
  6. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    No chip here, to many GMO potatoes for me....I have reported the bovine insinuation, I was merely pointing out that you do not know everything about farming, you have knowledge of what you have experienced, no better or worse than the rest of us.

    That is the most asinine comment, some choose to live here, some were born here and have little option to move, they are to busy helping the family make a living on the family farm. If we all chose to live in the 'most favored areas' how the heck do you think we would all get fed then?


    They are counted in the 2% losses, in the first week there are birds that are culled, because of issues like bad legs, they are a reality, our reality is as soon as a bird is identified as being bad legged, or any other major issue, they are dispatched...killed, murdered, culled, whatever word you care to use, they are not left to suffer. I know nothing about life span of egg layers.


    Do your vet and you talk about how much life would such if there was not as much chicken available, do you discuss how many people depend on availability of reasonably priced food...

    It is unrealistic to think that we can exist without intensive farming, of all kinds...
     
    manesntails and tlwidener like this.
  7. cschattner

    cschattner Senior Member

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    Growing up we got 2 Cornish hens as an oops when we picked up our chickens. Those two grew so fast, they where huge chickens. We where not going to butcher them and just kept them with our layers.
    They lived for maybe a year before both died of what we assumed heart attack.

    Both could hardly walk. They would take a couple steps then lay down, get up and take a couple more steps then rest again till they arrived at their destination.
    Neither could get through the coop door so every morning and night I would go out and bring them through the big doors either into the outdoor coop or back into the coop.
    I was sad when they died. Also surprised when they got so big. When you buy Cornish from the store it's a tiny bird but these two where full size monsters.
     
  8. CJ

    CJ Senior Member

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    The Chicken Revolution title keeps making me think of a commercial rotisserie, and the caption "Epic Fail".
    :X3:
    And Chickens in Choppers *(y) ML

    Mine would get quiet once they roosted and settled. And I had some luck teaching them what Hush-Up! meant, since they liked the branches of a sassafras tree perch that was still small enough to have Some flexibility/ vibration transference in the trunk.. :whistle:
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018
  9. Blondehorse

    Blondehorse Senior Member

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