Caution with Quest products

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Cher McRae, Dec 15, 2018.

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  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Have you pursued legal action with the company?

    Did you choose to use Quest this time to try to target a specific parasite?

    Do you mean that you gave your mare ivermectin routinely, and this was the first time you gave her Quest? Or that she was wormed with ivermectin and then Quest within a day this time?

    Did you have your vet do fecal counts and then worm them? Or do you worm them on a schedule basis?
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018
  2. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    Lawsuits don’t automatically lead to banning of a product- in fact they rarely do. But they do very often lead to better warnings, more extensive research, public knowledge and more care in their use.

    I’m not a fan of suing for every issue but it is pretty effective in product liability cases. And the discovery process allows parties to determine if a company was fully aware of the alleged problem, engaged in any coverup, acted recklessly etc., or if they acted in good faith.
     
  3. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    Was a necropsy done or were lab samples taken?
     
  4. Cher McRae

    Cher McRae Registered

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    Have not pursued legal action yet
    Am from Canada but am calling an equine lawyer today. It is worth noting that the warning labels on the Quest products in the US differ from the package I purchased in Canada. Far more and differing warnings on product sold in the US. If the company warns Americans, why not Canadians? I have had little to no sleep for a week. My 10 y/o gelding had a bout of colic last night so between my dead mare and this guy I have been up checking on horses every hour for the last eight days. Yes, I wormed him with Quest last Sunday. I am 57, live alone with a mother battling lung cancer, a brother who had a leg amputated, and suffers numerous other health issues. As I am the only other family member and they rely on my help. In addition I operate a 24/7 dog boarding and training business, and manage my 40 acres. My time is limited right now, so forgive me if I don't respond. Will update if I have information of value
     
  5. sherian

    sherian Senior Member

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    if a necropsy and lab samples were not done it will be a hard case to prove - correlation does not always equal causation and the courts are supposed to go with reasonable doubt.
    a friend of mine's horse had an allergic reaction to antisedan (the reversal agent for dormosedan) and died in minutes, tough when you loose one from things you can second guess yourself on, even though it is beyond your control in reality.
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Holy frijoles. That's the drug my pony got. I think it saved his life, fortunately he didn't have a bad reaction to it.
     
  7. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    I was made aware of risks with Quest dewormers about 15 years ago. I was a first time horse owner who took over ownership of a senior pony who had some neglect related health issues. My vet and horsey people advised me to never use Quest on her, especially since she was not up to date on working and could have a large worm load. She was also underweight when we got her, so easier to overdose with wormer. As far as I know, the risk with Quest is that there is a smaller safety margin, so it is easier to overdose them on. I believe with any wormer, colic, laminitis, and other issues can occur if they are wormed with a large worm load and there is a large and rapid die off of worms.

    Just from the risks and cases I've heard of, I never use it on my current two because one is a super senior, and the other has metabolic problems and history of laminitis. There are other products for me to use to cover my bases, which is what I do. There are plenty of people who use the products with no I'll effect, but of course every horse reacts differently, and there is a risk anytime we put any drug into the body.

    I'm so sorry for your loss, and the stress you are going through. I think you are correct, that if nothing more, better warnings and labels should exist in your country if they are indeed still different and less explicit than ours.
     
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  8. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    I have used Quest Plus for years with absolutely no problems. However, I will not give it to ponies, horses younger than 2 years old, senior horses, any horse that is not currently at a healthy weight or unknown wormload unless advised specifically by my vet. I use it, but I highly respect the possible outcomes. If Canada doesn't have the warnings we have in the US, by all means, that needs to be changed ASAP.
     
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  9. Cher McRae

    Cher McRae Registered

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    Yes to change! Have been in contact with Health Canadas Veterinary Drug Directorate to file an Adverse Drug Reaction report. They informed me they are not aware of the labelling change on Quest. It was done in the US last January. It is the company's responsibility to inform Health Canada of this change, but the vet at HC said they rarely do. They will follow up and enforce the change with Zoetis. May help in Canada. One thing that really disturbs me, is I did my research first, as I was concerned about my mare being older. I spoke with my vet, who told me to just give her the whole syringe...he was not aware of the risks, at that time, other than the foal issue. He is more aware now. Still concerned prior to administering, I read the labelling thoroughly. My package only warned of use in foals less than 4 months. Told me it was safe to give to adult horses. Nothing about minis, older or dilapidated horses as on US label. Had I read use extreme caution in older horses I would not have given it to her. For want of a couple lines on the warning label, there is a pretty good chance she would have been at the feeder this morning. Rather than administering the whole tube, I was careful to dose for her weight. She was happily standing in my pasture, like she has for the past 27 years, when I wormed her and 4-5 hours later the nightmare began. She was a priority in my daily life, and was in remarkable shape for her age. Not underweight, not dilapitated. Her bloodwork came back clean. Zoetis, formerly Fort Dodge had an issue with Proheart6 about 10 years ago. See link below. Same drug (Moxidectin) same drug company. Must say I don't have much consumer trust...thank you for your kind words. Losing your horse in this fashion is devastating.

    Watchdog risked career over pet-drug warning
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Caution is always needed in giving any older horse any drug.

    It's terrible what happened. And I am very sorry for your loss.

     

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