Canter lead issues

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by clja, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    How long have you had the horse? How often do you ride her? Do you get lessons? How often?

    It sounds like this is a longstanding habit that dates from before you got her. And that is not at all unusual. There are plenty of sound horses that won't pick up one lead.

    It sounds like you got her to pick up that lead for a little while, and then some time recently she stopped picking up that lead.

    How many months was the horse picking up both leads?

    How long has she not been picking up the one lead?

    What method did you use to get her to pick up the one lead? It sounds like that is no longer working, for whatever reason. And again, that could be physical, or it could be a training issue.

    A suggestion: don't try to get that lead 14 times. If you can't get it after three times, stop and go on to something else. Just drop it.

    What happens when you try 14 times is that the horse gets more and more 'confirmed' at picking up the wrong lead. Plus the horse gets sore in his muscles. If you keep doing it, you can create a problem in the stifles and hocks.
     
  2. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    I would at least have body work done at this point and see what happens. Saddle fit can also cause a sore horse unwilling to take leads. It doesn't always mean your horse is dead lame and you need a vet.
     
  3. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    I'm experiencing a similar issue, you could check out my thread if you want. Long story short, had sudden refusal to canter one way. Ended up being a stifle injury. He also wasn't obviously lame.
     
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  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Then she is off. Stop asking for it. Get her Vet checked. Horses don't fight a bit to keep their head to the outside in a turn for chitz and giggles, she's telling you it exacerbates an issue she has to put that much strain on her right side. Right hind, right front, one of her joints, stifle, back, etc.
     
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  5. clja

    clja Registered

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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I would have the vet look at my horse, do flexions, and I'd have the vet examine her teeth as well, as I never disregard the possibility of it being a physical problem, but I would not be completely surprised if the horse seemed to be physically just fine.

    My guess is that the previous owners had a lot of trouble getting that lead. Maybe the horse was given to a stronger rider or a trainer in order to get her sold. Well, eventually that 'wears off.'

    When you ask the horse to canter, based on your own description, you aren't doing anything to 'channel' her or keep her bent in the correct direction. To do that, you need to use your reins(not neck reining, direct reining), your leg, and your seat, not just tap with your legs.

    My guess is that 'the honeymoon is over.' You've had her about 10-11 months, and ... that's the honeymoon.
     
  7. clja

    clja Registered

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    Yea our trainer feels she just doesn't want to do it. She can do it, she has done it she just is weaker that way and by nature isn't the type of horse that wants to please, she literally likes to do the bare minimum needed for the job. But part of me just wants to make sure. When we struggled with this right after we got her we had a experienced young adult ride her twice a week for a month and by the end she did get the lead. So maybe she just needs a refresher but I hate if this is how it will always be. We do lots of raised poles and hill work equally to try and build up her hind end and work both directions the same amount.
     
  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Ah. So when you first got her, you had an experienced rider get on her for a month, to get her to take that lead.

    And since then she's been ridden by you only, for...9 months or so? Has your instructor or another rider been on her since?

    If she's a 'do the minimum' type horse she may need some general help in getting more responsive to your signals.

    I think it's smart of you to have a vet look at her.
     
  9. clja

    clja Registered

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    Another rider at the barn who is experienced also cannot get the lead this past week. I just worry that it is physical and she was just pushing through the last few months and now that it has suddenly gotten really cold something is hurting her. I also am scared if its a training issue it may be something she won't ever learn/do bc she is sooooo set in her ways. She's also the "if the jump is 2ft, I'm going to jump 2ft 1 cm" type of mare. never in a hurry to go anywhere would never buck bc its too much effort on her part.
     
  10. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Twice a week? Riding twice a week is right next to not riding at all. Conditioning a horse takes three days in a row, at least, preferably five, then a day off.

    Get the Vet out and get a GOOD one who can watch a horse trot a straight line to and away from them and SEE what area is off. Lunging shows you very little because the horse is off balance in an arc.
     

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