Canine Lymphoma-Supplements and questions

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by OrangeLexus, Feb 9, 2013.

  1. OrangeLexus

    OrangeLexus Senior Member

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    My 6.5 year old pit mix was diagnosed with Lymphoma early January and I chose not to do treatment but I did stop by Sprouts yesterday to pick up some supplements. I just picked up somethings that I have read about but I really don't know very much about supplements/alternatives in general and wanted to know if anyone had any input or ideas.


    Also I am going to pick up some Curcumin (w/Bromelain) tomorrow after reading that it had some anti-cancer/tumor shrinkage properties that have actually been backed up a bit, does anyone know what a good dosage is for this on a 80 lbs dog? I read anywhere from 50mg-250mg per day.


    Also what is something that is good for kidney support? Something that I could buy for a human would be ideal. She is on a very high dose of Prednisone (60mg per day) and would like something to help out her kidneys.


    So this is what I have started her on so far:
    4000mg Fish Oil
    350mg Milk Thistle
    2180mg Pao d' Arco
    450mg Kelp


    2 Teaspoon fresh ginger
    1 Clove fresh garlic


    60mg Pred and 10mg Pepcid twice daily to go with the Pred.


    And just so people don't think I am too crazy-I know nothing that I give her is going to save her I am just trying to make the best of the time she has left be it a day or a year.


    Any input on anything is very appriciated!
     






  2. Lise

    Lise Senior Member+

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    I will honestly be the naysayer and say that I don't think anything herbal is going to help in the slightest. I think you would be better off saving up all that money and putting it toward a round of chemo.

    Doxorubicin (chemotherapy) can be used with some success as a rescue treatment to give you a bit more time, without doing a full chemo protocol. Even a single dose of doxorubicin can sometimes give you a remission for a couple of months.

    ETA: Also I would ditch the garlic right away... garlic can be toxic and can cause a severe (fatal) hemolytic anemia.
     
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  3. Purpledomino

    Purpledomino Senior Member+

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    Sorry to hear that your dog has lymphoma... I lost my Great Dane to lymphoma two years ago, I am now dealing with my Bullmastiff that has mast cell cancer as well right now. I remember my vet telling me that thankfully lymphoma is a cancer that acts very quick in dogs, which may be hard to hear, but for the dogs sake it may be a humane thing. I euthanized my Abby because I could tell that she wasn't very comfortable any more, and her standard of living was declining very quickly.

    It's so hard...I know. Whatever you do, keep in mind the comfort of the dog and her quality of life more so than your own feelings. I chose to euthanize my girl before she was in real dire straights healthwise, because I can't bear to see my animals suffer in the least...especially when there is such a grim prognosis. Happily though, my Bullmastiff is doing well so far without any treatment other than the tumour removal and strict Benadryl regimen (knock on wood..).

    As long as your supplements go...I'm not well versed with anything other than the regular salmon oil, coconut oil, glucosamin/chondroitin that my dogs get so I'm not able to help you there. Have you considered a visit with a holistic vet? Many times they can recommend things to help, I know my sisters dog was helped immensely with some things that a holistic vet suggested to her dog with mast cell cancer.

    Good luck.
     
  4. Asfaloth

    Asfaloth Senior Member+

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  5. OrangeLexus

    OrangeLexus Senior Member

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    I would do chemo if I honestly thought it was going to be fair and worth it to her but she is absolutely terrified of the vets office and it would just be awful to put her through that especially just to gain a few months.

    She is actually pit and dane (No one believes it until they see her, I thought the rescue I got her from was crazy until she grew)...my vet said that he sees Lymphoma a lot in both pits and great danes-danes especially. Vet said the average is about 4 months if you catch it early which I think we did as her blood work did not show it was effecting her system yet. I don't think she will make it that long, as soon as she starts to go down hill I am going to put her down I don't want her to feel sick at all and I cannot bring myself to watch her waste away. Right now she completely acts herself other than the enlarged lymphnodes-which thankfully don't seem to bother her. The first week on Pred was really hard I thought I was just going to have to put her down then but she did come out of it and has since been normal. I am just trying to really make whatever quality time she has left the best it can be as soon as she's not her normal self I am planning to have her put down at home so she doesn't have to go back to the vet.

    I have been thinking about going to holistic vet that is pretty close by-I am just on the fence about it because they look pretty hokey but I think I might call and see what they are about.

    If you don't mind me asking how did it go with your dane? Was she okay with the enlarged nodes? Did she just stop eating? What medication was she on?

    Thanks-I was thinking about Astragulus, I'll check it out!

    Thanks again to all of you
     
  6. Purpledomino

    Purpledomino Senior Member+

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    Actually when I initially took her to the vet for swelling in her throat, my regular vet was out of town and I got a different one. Unfortunately, she didn't catch that any other nodes were swollen, and diagnosed her as having an infection, putting her on antibiotics. After that course of antibiotics, she seemed to look a bit better for awhile until I started to find blood on her bed. Took her in to see my regular vet, and she found all her lymph nodes were swollen and the reason for the blood was that she was bleeding from her rectum, which was likely more tumours.

    At that time, she was starting to also have trouble eating so we decided to let her go right then. She was almost nine, which is very aged for a giant breed, so she did live well past what was expected. I understand why you don't want to go the chemo route...we just had to think that over for our Bullmastiff as well. He's almost seven, and we are just going to make sure he is comfortable, happy and not in any pain while he is still with us. My sister did chemo with her dog, and told me she wouldn't do it again because her dog seemed to deteriorate faster with that treatment. Not that all dogs do...but hers did. I think that influenced my decision, as well as my dogs age.

    Just as a sidenote, my Bullmastiff Ruben also has Wobblers syndrome, and we had a specialist do surgery to stabilize his neck with two titanium plates. This was extremely expensive, and just after the hair grew back from his long incision was when we noticed a growth on his back leg. My vet didn't think it was anything terrible, and removed it. Well the biopsy came back as a stage 3 mast cell tumour....just our luck. Ruben just can't catch a break!
     
  7. OrangeLexus

    OrangeLexus Senior Member

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    Interesting that they didn't catch the other lymphnodes or that you didn't feel them, Originally I took her to the vet because the nodes in her belly/groin were swollen I had not even felt/seen the ones in her throat. The belly ones haven't grown back to be as big as they were-mainly just the ones in her throat. I think every dog is different because hers are about a little smaller than golf ball-size where her throat ties into her chin and visible. As soon as they came back after her first cortizone shot I called the vet and thought I was going to put her down because I figured she would stop eating and they would be bothering her but he told me to give her a few days and see if they actually started to bother her and they don't seem to be-which is crazy.

    Chemo just seems like a lose/lose to me. All that time they have to spend in the vet's office, feeling sick, and they rarely even go into remission for more than a couple months, on top of all the costs-I just don't think it's worth it. Seems like those that take that route don't even get to enjoy the time they have left with the dog.

    I think it's kind of a good think that you didn't really know what it was until she was very progressed and you were able to just put her down then-that sounds bad but I think it is easier. I just recently lost one of my horses VERY unexpectedly two days before I found the dogs lumps and I would take unexpected over knowing now. I feel it would be selfish to put her down right now since she is still fine and I want to spend as much time with her as possible and try to make her last days as good as I can but fast and unexpected is soooo much easier than knowing it's coming.

    I am so sorry to her about Ruben-he really can't catch a break-that's just crazy.
     
  8. Fancy's Joe

    Fancy's Joe Senior Member+

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    Oh no, I'm so sorry. :(

    Our golden was diagnosed with lymphoma just before christmas. We looked into chemo and the different drugs, and ultimately decided to just spoil her until she was no longer comfortable, and then put her down. It was very quick, probably due to her age. Within a week, she went from acting normally, going on walks, eating her food to sleeping all day, refusing to go outside, and only eating very soft/mushy foods. The vet had told us that, toward the end, she would be very sick. We decided it would be kinder to let her go before she reached that stage.

    So what I mean to say is, you know your dog and know what's best for her. If you think chemo is a bad idea, then you're most likely right. If you think supplements might help, then go ahead and give her supplements. Just keep in mind that her comfort and quality of life are what's most important.
     
  9. Purpledomino

    Purpledomino Senior Member+

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    Omg sorry about your horse too...I too lost a three year old gelding (colic) within two months of losing Abby which was so difficult, and unexpected as well. It seems like we have both walked this path, sad to say. Hang in there, you are doing all the right things for your dog and she is lucky that you are going the extra mile to make her time with you happy and pain free. It's going to be tough....but it does get better in the end.
     
  10. Purpledomino

    Purpledomino Senior Member+

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    So sorry about your Golden... Good advice here as well. My sisters dog that had lymphoma was a Golden as well...seems to be a pattern here. Unfortunately for us, our dogs aren't as long lived as we are, and it's so hard to see them go.
     






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