Can you put a waterproof blanket on a wet horse?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by janelle12, Apr 7, 2007.

  1. janelle12

    janelle12 Full Member

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    Ok i know its a weird question, but I board my horse, and she has a waterproof blanket but its not on her right now. It's rainy and sleety outside. She does not have a shelter in her pasture and there are no stalls out there (My sister's horses have a shelter but they're in a separate paddock and haven't been introduced yet as my horse is new out there). Should I go out there and kind of towel dry her off, and put the blanket on? My sister says it does more harm than good if they are not completely dry underneath. My reasoning says even if she's damp, itll hold her body heat in and keep the cold wet rain off. What say you educated people?
     






  2. RowdyRio1324

    RowdyRio1324 Senior Member+

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    My horse has a waterproof blanket and i put it on her once when she wasnt completly dry, but pretty close. I dont like putting them on if the horse is wet. So if you do go put a blanket on her, try to dry her off as best as you can, but if she is still really wet, i wouldnt put it on her.
     
  3. Just_me

    Just_me Senior Member+

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    I would rub her dry (or at least close to)with a towel before you put on the blanket.If the coat is just a little damp and the blanket is breathable I wouldn't worry about it.The problem with wet coat and an unbreathable blanket is that the water has nowhere to go,it will probably start to smell after 24 hours,and the blanket could rub.
     
  4. janelle12

    janelle12 Full Member

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    ok I went out there and she was standing in a triangle with her head down shivering in the back of the paddock. She looked miserable. Her back and rump was damp and she had little loose ice chunks (sleet) on her back. I tied her up and used two very large beach towels to dry her off. she was mostly dry, then I laid another beach towel lengthwise and put her blanket on (its waterproof, i dont know if its breathable or not). She was obviously considerably more comfortable after doing this. plus it pretty much quit raining by then. well mostly anyways. we are supposed to get rain through tomorrow afternoon. my sister is going to remove the beach towel underneath in a couple hours and i am going out tomorrow in the late morning to check her again. I think she will be ok like this. I also threw her some more hay so she could have the extra warmth from the extra food/digestion.
     
  5. Morri

    Morri Senior Member+

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    Here's an old trick for blanketing a wet horse. It may sound silly, but it works! Put the blanket on and then stuff hay under it between the skin and the blanket. This does 2 things... the hay absorbs the moisture so the blanket doesn't freeze from it, AND it recreates the air space between the horse and the blanket that the hair normally provides thereby recreating the insulation layer for holding in the warmth.
     
  6. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    Is it ideal? No. But, if it's BREATHABLE, then yes, it can work - I've had to do it several times over the years.

    The hay/straw trick is a good one. It doesn't really keep things from freezing, it creates an air pocket between the horse and the blanket, allowing air to circulate and moisture to move off the horse.
     
  7. janelle12

    janelle12 Full Member

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    good tip. my only question would be wouldnt the hay make it kinda itchy??
     

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