Can you explain the difference please?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by NBChoice, Sep 18, 2017.

  1. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    I admit that I am making this thread a little early as I don't have a lot of information at this point yet. However, I want to know the subtle differences between how a horse may move if they have a stifle injury vs a SI problem. I'm really not much good at spotting lameness unless it is severe. So I guess my question is... will there be a noticeable difference in how the horse moves depending on if the stifle is injured or the SI area is injured? Is that too difficult of a question to answer without more information?

    I'm asking because I've been suspecting some issues with Sublime for the majority of this show season now. Initially we thought it was his hocks. But I'm wondering if it isn't higher up. At a show this weekend I had a couple trainers look at him while I rode and they both said they believe he has some type of issue with his right hind leg. The one trainer said he believed it could be related to his stifle by the way he was moving. They're obviously not vets, so I am going to get a vet to look at him again.

    Sublime had started swishing his tail more and more at the canter throughout this summer and initially I thought it was related to his hocks and perhaps how I was riding him. But then at one point he even had a bunny hop type canter. That hasn't happened again, but at this show this weekend he would not stop swishing his tail at all unless we were walking. He has never swished his tail in the trot until this weekend, so I figure the problem has not been solved. Anyway. I have a video from our class this weekend that I can post later on today if anyone is interested in seeing it to see if they also see a stifle problem, or something else. It almost looks like he is hesitant to step underneath himself with his right hind, especially at the canter. Until then-any info about stifle or SI injuries is much appreciated.
     
  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Stifle presents as stabbing with the hind feet (toe points to the ground and takes all of the push, heels stay off the ground), with or without a noticable hiking of the hind end. (Elevation of the hip or hips depending on if it's one or both stifles.)

    SI can present in a number of different ways, for instance hollowing, bunny hopping, crookedness, etc. One or all of tjose and more mannerisms could present.
     
  3. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    Here's a short video from earlier this summer. This is his worst lead and shows some of the canter issues we had. The kick was the first and only time he's ever done that.
     
  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    He extends farther behind with the near hind, doesn't get under himself at all with either. He looks sore in the body from the shoulder back, more sore in the right hind, but I need to see him go both ways to be sure of the that.
     
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  5. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    I'll upload the whole video from the show this weekend which shows walk, trot and canter going both directions and then you can tell me what you think. I appreciate your input.
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Well he's definitely sore, that's for sure. I would say he's sore in the stifles and hocks, but he looks sore up top, too. I would just take him to a lameness vet. The sacro-iliac joint, the stifle and hock joint all are physically bound together and function together, making it very difficult to narrow things down from a video.

    I used to giggle when people would post videos of a hind leg lameness and there would be 100 different replies, all naming the lameness being in different legs and all insisting that the cause was a different joint or tendon (in any one of the four available legs....about 50 per cent of the time, the other 50 per cent of the time it was from the back, teeth, neck or stomach....). After a while (25 years...lol....doh....) I decided that pride goeth before a fall and so doth diagnosing hind leg lameness from a video.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2017
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  7. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    The lameness vet I took him to said it was his hocks and I feel like he kind of blew me off like my concerns were too little to deal with. He's super busy so I feel like he just sort of diagnosed him and didn't do a thorough enough exam to pin point exactly where the soreness is coming from. :( I'd like to take Sublime to k-state, but I don't know how that process would work... if they would just let me make an appointment or if I need a referral or what. Plus I don't know if that would be way more expensive than a regular vet or not.
     
  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Well a 'more expensive vet' can be an awful lot cheaper in the long run if you get the right diagnosis and hence the right treatment to start with. The more vets you have to visit and the more the wrong diagnosis and treatment plan screw up your horse, the more expensive it gets.
     
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  9. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    You're entirely correct. And I just looked at k-state's website and it looks like anyone can just make an appointment and they say their prices are comparable to "regular" vets. Maybe this would be a better option than just going back to the same vet I dealt with earlier this year...
     
  10. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    University Vets are better because they have lame horses in more often, look at more of them and can catch things that regular, “Shots and Snots“ Vets don't often see.

    Their costs are similar for most things but they use diagnostics and more of them that make your final cost higher, but then, you get a better diagnosis and save money in the long run.
     

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