Can alfalfa make horses hyper /jumpy

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by horsecrazy1982, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. horsecrazy1982

    horsecrazy1982 Senior Member

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    can alfalfa make horses hyper /jumpy

    my mare has been getting alfalfa hay and some cubs at the stables but the last week i am having a hard time win riding her. she just wants to go go go and dose not want to stop and is a little jumpy
    last year at another stables i gave her cubs in the winter. but she was not like this but she was not getting as good of hay and grain as she is at this new stables
     
  2. PeggySue

    PeggySue Senior Member+

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    Yes some horses have a reaction like you are discribing when fed alfalfa ... remove it all from her diet
     
  3. horsecrazy1982

    horsecrazy1982 Senior Member

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    i was not sure she has neaver had a problem with it before but she on a good grain now and lots of good grass and did not have that at the other stables.

    she has just been gitting little bits of hay of it and some pellets and cubes of it some but not all the time
     
  4. ejforrest

    ejforrest Senior Member+

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    I would say the grain is the problem not the hay. Grains messes with the insulin and glucose making the horse hyper/flighty. Alflafa hay is high in protein. "Protein-long assumed to be an energy source for the body, its real role is to provide amino acids(the building blocks of bones, muscles, and soft tissues) for growth and repair." Extra protein wont cause hyper/flighty horses.
    Changes in the weather will cause a horse to be more spooky/hyper.

    By: Wayne Loch, PhD (Animal Science), associate professor of animal science, University of Missouri-Columbia:
    Cold weather doesn't just affect appetite changes; it can affect behavior. Cold weather, especially when combined with wind or with a sudden downward turn in temperatures, can make a horse a little more flighty.

    "When it's colder, horses feel better and like to play a little bit more," Loch said. "They're more energetic."
     
  5. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    my normally deadhead WP horse gets completely WHACKO on any alfalfa! (even just one tiny flake with his grass morning and night for 1-2 days is enough to do it!
     
  6. PeggySue

    PeggySue Senior Member+

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    ahhhhhhhhhhhh remove all grains and replace with a forage basd feed or ration balanacer
     
  7. horsecrazy1982

    horsecrazy1982 Senior Member

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    it is not the grain she has been on the same grain for 10 mounts and no problem
     
  8. horse345

    horse345 Senior Member+

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    I had my paint WP mare on alfalfa and it made her whacko! Her grain or anything else has not changed, I just started adding in some alfalfa.

    While on the alfalfa, she was jumpy, wouldn't focus and all she wanted to do was run. I took her off the alfalfa a couple of days ago and she is slowly getting better. I guess it takes while to leave the system (at least I hope).

    I added alfalfa to my POA mare's diet as well, and she is exactly the same as she always is.

    So I think it depends on the horse. Some can handle it and some cannot.
     
  9. meljean

    meljean Senior Member

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    The alfalfa will do that, some horses tolerate it better, just get a little more energy, but some it will have dancing the Watusi.

    We gave it to horses in heavy training, or crushed in the feed for TB's mares/foals, and even then there was bound to be one that would get so pumped up they were all over the place.

    And, any feed change can cause this type of thing, oats, sweet, pellets, there are always going to be horses that just can't tolerate it, and like one reiner I worked with, just one flake of peanut hay, within two hours he was climbing stall walls.

    Best way to tell? Cut the alfalfa out and see if there is a difference. It may take a week or so to get completely out of system. If there is a difference, then that is your answer.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2009
  10. Shotgun93

    Shotgun93 Senior Member+

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    Just because your horse has been on the same grain for 10 months with no problems doesn't mean that problems can't arise after long term use.
     

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