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Can a change in temp cause Colic?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by sarahhowen, Dec 2, 2008.

  1. sarahhowen

    sarahhowen Senior Member+

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    Ok so this may seem a strange question but I am a firm believer that the only stupid question is the one you don't ask!!!

    I have a TBX mare who is 15 years old, I have had her for 18 months and twice during that 18 months she has had mild spasmodic colic, the first time is was unbearably hot (a lot hotter than usual) and then the second time (last night) it went really cold, it is usually at the moment going down to 0 degrees, last night it got down to minus 7, Now this got me thinking could the temperature changes maybe be triggering these mild bouts of colic???

    I will point out they are mild cases, last night probably being a little more severe but still she walked it off with the assistance of some Collese (wonder stuff if you have a horse that is serceptable to mild colic - would be useless of it was an impaction but still useful to have in the feedroom)

    Any ways could this be linked to the weather changes?????
     
  2. ParkedOut

    ParkedOut Senior Member

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    I am not sure if temperature in general can cause it, but I am nearly positive that too cold water to drink can...

    Someone correct me if I am wrong. I knwo I heard somewhere that water that is too cold can be a cause of impact colic.
     
  3. bugsys22575

    bugsys22575 Senior Member+

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    I used to work woth a horse that everytime the temperature dropped suddenly (like after a cold front), he would colic mildly. We knew to just keep the Banamine on hand and usually it would only take 1/2 of a regular dose and he would be fine again.
     
  4. Limmerick

    Limmerick Senior Member

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    I have one of those in my back yard....any drastic temp changes kick him into it...we were having 12-18F days...then one day it reached almost 40F...and colic. Some banamine and light walking and letting him lay down, sternum up, to rest...and he was fine....then a few days later..temp dropped back down suddenly...and he did it again.
     
  5. sarahhowen

    sarahhowen Senior Member+

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    Hmmmm so it could be connected then, that I suppose leads on to my next question which is does anyone have any suggestions how to prevent this (I obviously can't control the weather ) but maybe adding some sort of probiotic or something to her feed........?

    Thanks for the responses guys
     
  6. Preppy_Ponies

    Preppy_Ponies Senior Member

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    That's exactly what worked for my guy! He gets half a dose of probiotics everyday and when we have sudden weather changes he gets a full dose. He has always been the kind of horse that either mildly coliced or got diarrhea when the weather changed. But we've been doing the probiotics for about a year and he hasn't had any trouble with the weather changes.
     
  7. Limmerick

    Limmerick Senior Member

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    someone suggested to me the probiotics for my gelding...tried them (still do..) but no changes on the mild colics with temp changes.

    I'm lucky in the fact that I have my horses right in my back yard and can run out and check on them several times a day (if i'm not already spending my whole day with them).

    However..this is the same horse that will work himself into a colic if he's stalled...which is why when I had my barn built, I made sure the stall doors opened right up into their field and I just leave them open to come and go as they please.
     
  8. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    Yes. If it gets much hotter too quickly, the horse may not drink enough in the first day or two to keep up with the extra hydration needed.

    If it gets cold quickly, the horse may not drink nearly enough compared to what he was drinking.

    And, the changes in barometric pressure, particularly associated with a cold front (pressure drops) can cause gas colic in some horses.
     
  9. CJ

    CJ Senior Member

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    I put sheets on my horse/s when the temp goes into the 40s and have not had to deal with a temp-shock colic for years. Recently one of the Arabs colicked when it got cold quick up here, and the vet said she was seeing a Lot of colics, bc horses werent ready for the hard cold quite yet. A lil banamine that night and a sheet on every cold night since, and only the boarder's naked horse has seemed a lil off one night since.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2008
  10. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    That reminds me of something else that is possibly related - your comment about blanketing resolving the issues reminded me:

    When I do some major hind end body work on my gelding, he gets very loose and gassy. It would stand to reason that the tighter the muscles are, such as when a horse is cold, the more prone to a gas colic they could be.
     

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