Calypso got cast in her stall

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Dona Worry, Dec 31, 2018.

  1. peg4x4

    peg4x4 Senior Member

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    It's no wonder this mare was such a mess when she first got to you. She'd been trying to communicate for years and had given up on finding a rational being. Also,they didn't have peppermints
     
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  2. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    I love that you two have such clear communication with each other. She certainly has come a long way...
    I am glad she managed to dodge all the nails and didn't hurt herself worse....
     
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  3. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    One of our first horses was kinda dumb. No lie. Got cast more than once. But, his biggest claim to fame was when he got his hoof stuck inside his corner feeder. Why he put his foot inside that feeder was anyone’s guess. His knee was up to his chin. He had struggled for some time until one of the young girls and her mother came to the barn. They didn’t know what to do so finally got the broom and put it thru under his bent leg and popped it out.

    Lost a lot of skin struggling, but ended up just very sore.
     
  4. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

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    Willow has done this a couple times. She's got the sense to just lay there though.

    She tends to do it in corners of pipe pens when there's lots of sand.

    I can usually get a rope on a hind foot and roll her over. She's usually a little stuff but not bad.... probably because she just lays there waiting for help. I have a poultice from Su-Per performance (gateway products) that is good on muscles. Gateway is local to me.

    She is hobble trained... I think all horses should be.
     
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  5. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    Judging from her condition when she arrived, they didn't have food either!

    I think Chiro has made a positive impact on her physical health, but honestly, her MENTAL health seems to have benefited the most. It completely changed the relationship with the vet ( Dr. K is now one of her favorite people, as she sees her several times a year WITHOUT needles) and it gave her a chance to learn how to show problems and then get them attended to.
    It's like she has learned a new language, and now she has a way to communicate with humans, or, well, a couple of specific humans.
     
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  6. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    Thank you for this thread I enjoy reading you tell the story and the little educational bits here and there.
     
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  7. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    I think your mare is smart and has excellent self-preservation instincts.

    I watched my mule slip and fall in a pipe pen in the mountains. She slid on the rubber mats right into the corner of the pen with all four legs under the bottom rail and outside the pen, her belly pressed against the rail and her head crammed in the corner. She began to struggle, thrashing and banging the pipe so I panicked with her and started out the door of the camper to help her. My husband made me wait!
    Her thrashing did not last as long as it took my husband to tell me to sit down and watch her. She laid very still, trying to twist her head around so she could see how she was stuck. She then tucked her feet tight to her belly and used her knees/upper legs to push on the bottom rail. She would shove on the rail then try to stand. Push on the rail and try to stand. Push on the rail and try to stand. She was using her head and neck to push on the ground and the rail but not thrashing or flailing.
    It took her about 5 minutes to get far enough away from the rail to roll onto her belly. She still was too tight against the rail to stand so she rolled back to her side and started pushing again!
    Smart girl finally got up on her own and was none the worse for it. She had road rash on her neck and shoulder where she slid on the mats but no injuries at all from trying to stand back up.

    Calypso may be part mule! It is comforting to know they are smart enough to get themselves out of a predicament without doing permanent damage to themselves.
     
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  8. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    Yes, I tell her every time I see her that I would 100% always prefer she break the stall before her legs.
    The farrier was out Thursday, and Calypso was inclined to be fussy about holding her legs up as high as normal, but the farrier just recently lost her (very very very old) donkey after he got cast in his stall, and was inclined to be sympathetic, which was pretty much all Calypso needed to hear!
     
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  9. sherian

    sherian Senior Member

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    @equinitis - had one do something similar. My pinto of unknown origins rolled got his hind legs thru the fence, tried to get up, realised his legs were stuck and stopped. Cranked his head around to look, carefully pulled his legs out, tucked them up, wiggled a bit to give himself room than got up.
     
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  10. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    Bella once got a hoof caught in her hay net when she was rolling. Her hind shoe slipped over a piece of the net and that was it. Another boarder found her sort of hanging upside down. And what was great was that she never panicked - she just lay there waiting for someone to free her. She's a ditzy TB but she keeps her head in an emergency.

    No more hay nets in stalls for me. it was pretty high but she has long legs.

    I saw that with Bella too. Once she realized how much better chiro made her feel, it hugely increased her level of trust in her professional staff. Now I think she loves her chiro more than me. :cautious:
     

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