Calypso got cast in her stall

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Dona Worry, Dec 31, 2018.

  1. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    She seems ok, but man. I'M rattled.
    The horses have been given free access to their stalls 24/7. This generally means they are out all day and only go inside during bad weather or to lie down, as the ground is hard as a rock.
    The neighbors are gone for NYE so I am looking after the horses from yesterday morning through Thursday, and today, I get to to barn and Calypso meets me out on pasture and she is SO MISERABLE. Pout face, stiff, and just had that sort of sorry for herself look animals get. I panicked at once, because it's what I do and rushed over. She informed me, via pouty face and turning her butt, that her right hind leg was SUPER OUCHY. I couldn't find anything wrong at all, other than a tiny bit of heat (and no swelling) in the ankle. Closer examination found more ouchy spots-- right side, particularly the ribs ALL OF HER CHEST, ALL OF IT, neck, and HERE RIGHT HERE, ie her right ear, which was extraordinarily dirty (she is really good at communication sometimes, this horse).
    I was concerned, but led her inside (not limping, but very very stiff all over) and found her stall
    Completely destroyed.
    All the lower boards are kicked out on one side, the corner feeder is torn off and crushed, her door (which was latched open??) is cracked in the middle, just. . . Completely demolished. She must have lay down, gotten stuck, and thrashed to free herself.
    I am glad that she destroyed the stall and not herself.
    I can't believe she's ok.
    The sheer number of exposed nails, bolts, etc, is terrifying.
    There is, literally, not a scratch on her.
    Calypso recieved a new stall, some bute, a handful of peppermints and lots of sympathy. I am going to try and mend 'her' stall and bank the sides of it before tonight.
    On the one hand, I want to get the vet out for her. On the other hand, I know her regular vet is on vacation, I just plain don't like the emergency vet, and I really don't think this is an emergency.

    She was outside eating hay when I left. Other than general muscle soreness and a subdued attitude, she looks fine. She has a chiropractic appointment end of January I will probably bump up regardless of if I decide to get a vet out sooner, poor baby.

    Any advice on what, if anything, I should do for her today, other than keep an eye on her?
     
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  2. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    Wow, that’s scary! So many bad things could have happened in that scenario! You dodged a bullet.

    I’d keep a close eye on her, ice any swollen spots, give her a lot of love and be incredibly thankful.
     
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  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I would be suspicious that she destroyed her stall and got cast due to having colic.

    Horses certainly do 'once in a blue moon, JUST get cast, no reason, just...rolled the wrong way or whatever.' Sure. That happens.

    But often, there is a reason for it.

    Especially in winter, as horses very easily colic in winter. These seem to often be impaction colics.

    So I would be taking her pulse and heart rate and respiration rate for the next 24 hours.

    I might give her some banamine.

    If she has an impaction colic, it may take several days to 'work itself out.' If that is the case, you might see more episodes of... discomfort.

    A horse can have an impaction colic and still pass manure. While you probably know that, it bears repeating for other readers: Just passing manure does not mean 'everything is okay.' There can be a blockage/impaction in the gut, and normal manure beyond it. That manure that is past the blockage, can get passed while the blockage still remains.

    I'd be sure that she was getting outside as much as possible, and getting as much exercise as possible. I'd make sure she drank a lot of water.

    Horses will usually drink more water if the water is tepid rather than cold - they especially cut down their drinking of cold water in winter, probably an effort to not get colder.

    I've also put a handful of bran - or their usual grain or molasses - in the warm water to encourage them to drink it.

    Or you can have a Wuss Horse that will drink five 2 gallon buckets of warm water in a row - if you hold it for him....
     
  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Eh, it happens. Muscle sore she will fix herself by letting nature heal her up.

    We had one big two year old colt that every stinking morning, all four legs were out in the aisle. He was sound asleep. We would take the gate off his stall ( wire gate with neck yoke ) and roll him over. He got so used to use rolling him over, he would barely even wake up~!!
     
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  5. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    They have a heated waterer, and she has always drunken more than the other horses.
    She also likes to lie down more than the other two, and it does look like she just got herself trapped in a corner-- at least, it's the corner that got destroyed.
     
  6. mimi5876

    mimi5876 Senior Member

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    my horse cast himself in the round pen once, I saw the whole thing happen. He rolled too close to the wall and got himself stuck. I was scared for him because his legs were going through the rails and he had no way to get himself up. I pushed his legs through the panels and then he was able to push on the panels to get up. I read somewhere that there are two types of horses- those that cast themselves multiple times and those that do so once and never again. My horse is definitely the latter :p. Even if he rolls close to the side of round pens or the arena, he doesnt roll over and doesnt get himself stuck anymore.

    Im glad Calypso is relatively unscathed and hopefully its just some muscle soreness that'll go away with time!
     
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  7. sherian

    sherian Senior Member

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    I'm in the just keep an eye on her, it is just one of those stupid ways horses try to commit suicide. I have even had horses get cast in a snowdrift in the middle of a field.
     
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  8. Rachel1786

    Rachel1786 Senior Member

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    I was just saying to the boarder at our barn last night how I'm so paranoid Bella is going to get herself cast because she was rolling in her stall again(shes developed a habit of rolling in the shavings especially when it's been a little damp outside), everytime I hear her do it I hold my breath because she will not be an easy one to get in there to help her lol.

    I hope Calypso feels better soon, if you have any liniment that might help(I like the "sore no more" and "natural release muscle wash")
     
  9. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    I wouldn't be freaking out about colic. In the winter when the ground is hard as a rock, mine choose to roll inside the barn on softer ground. I've had one get stuck under a pipe fence and bent the hail out of it. She got up on the outside and spent the day visiting all of the other horses while I was at work. It happens just because. Glad it wasn't worse.
     
  10. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    She is still very very sorry for herself, and inclined to tell me about it, but has a good appetite.
    I swear, getting regular chiro has taught this horse excellent communication skills. She knows how to tell a human EXACTLY what needs attention, and isn't ashamed to do so.
    Her ankle still hurts, btw, and she reeeaaallly wants a prolonged neck massage.
    Also, peppermints are an EXCELLENT remedy for a variety of ills, in case I needed to know.
     

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