Buying a gelding

Discussion in 'Critique My Horse' started by WesternRider22, Jun 6, 2018.

  1. waresbear

    waresbear Senior Member

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    Those look like neglected horses. If you want to bring them back to health and give them a good life, that would be all you would get out of them.
     
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  2. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    From your previous posts you have (had) a 25 year old that you were asking about racing, and a 16 year old with mild arthritis.

    The last thing you need is a cheap prospect, that may not hold up to work, so glad you passed on the gelding.

    If you are shopping for cheap prospects, but have no real idea of conformation, and how to judge it, then you could be heading for disaster. Cheap prospects are fine if you have the knowledge to choose, the skill to develop, and either deep pockets to fund, or the ruthlessness to move on, if they have issues.

    For most of us it is a much better bet to pay a little more for something a lot better.
     
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  3. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

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    I really don't like the long pasterns on that dun filly.

    Don't settle--if you don't want a mare don't get a mare. Don't buy a random neglected grade for $800. You can find a nice registered AQHA or Paint for around $1k or less if you're patient, but that's generally only advisable if you have the means to bring it along yourself or have it trained. Cheap is rarely actually cheap in the horse world.
     
  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Can't tell unless you get conformation photos tbh. Not a huge fan of her shoulder, but really need to see her stripped of tack and standing four square. There's a post here at the top of the board with instructions if you're close to her.

    I've no problems with mares, if you don't like them though pass.
     
  5. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

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    Give us a rough location of where you are looking--I love finding horses for sale.

    What's your budget, and what is your current skill level?
     
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  6. WesternRider22

    WesternRider22 Full Member

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    I already have a 9 year old gelding that I am starting on barrels.
    I'm just looking for a good gelding for the kids even if he needs a tune up or is green I don't mind trainng him first. My kids know how to ride and take lessons.
     
  7. WesternRider22

    WesternRider22 Full Member

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    I'm looking in Oklahoma around Tulsa area. I don't want spend anymore than 800. I have trained horses before but I prefer something more green than untrained completely. I don't want anything older than 12.
    Thanks you for offering to help!
     
  8. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    Not a huge fan of the front pasterns on the filly. Not a deal breaker necessarily. That gelding is a train wreck. I own 3 mares, they're all different. I wouldn't pass on her for being a mare. What do you plan to do with this horse?
     
  9. OfHorsesAndFlies

    OfHorsesAndFlies Full Member

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    I have to admit... that geldings weight has me a little concerned...
     
  10. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Three year olds are not kids horses. The sorrel is extremely sickle hocked and has long sloping, weak pasterns in front.

    Here's a suggestion, buy an older horse, in good shape, in light work at the moment, and before you call them, study up on horse conformation. Look for a horse with no glaring conformational flaws.

    Once you find one, then call and make an appt. to see it. Tell the owner you want it unhandled that morning, not even brushed. You want to go catch it in the field, brush, saddle and ride it.

    If you can't do that yourself with someone else's horse, then the horse is not well enough broke for a beginner.
     
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