Breeding a Flaxen to a Flaxen

Discussion in 'Horse Breeding' started by Doll-Face, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. Doll-Face

    Doll-Face Senior Member+

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    All you color experts, is there any way to let me know what my possible foal colors may be?? My mare is a flaxen chesnut, as is the stud I am considering breeding her to.
    Therefore! I am quite curious. Thanks!
     






  2. Heavenly Jumper

    Heavenly Jumper Senior Moderator

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    breeding chestnut to chestnut is 100% chestnut offspring :)
     
  3. Little Red Dun

    Little Red Dun Senior Member+

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    Well, chestnut to chestnut always equals a chestnut.:D I don't know about the flaxen though. Some stallions seem to pass flaxen on a lot, and others don't. I'm not sure what (if any) research has been done on how flaxen passes along.

    ((Edited to add: Woo-hoo, my 200th post))
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2007
  4. Doll-Face

    Doll-Face Senior Member+

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    WELL! lol, didnt know that, about the chestnut thing. Call me stupid? lol

    Anyway, I really hope the flaxen carries on, I just love it. Ill have to do some research around the net...

    Thanks you two! :D
     
  5. 3WishesDun

    3WishesDun Senior Member+

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    Flaxen only affects red. (although black based horses can carry it) It is thought to be a recessive gene and there isn't a whole lot of information on it's inheritance.
     
  6. Doll-Face

    Doll-Face Senior Member+

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    SO, I guess Im pretty much screwed on getting a flaxen, haha. O well, thats not why I picked him anyway :D.

    Question, how do you know if your horse is red or black based? I know next to nothing about color genetics.
     
  7. MyBelgianAzzy

    MyBelgianAzzy Senior Member+

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    All the haflingers are flaxen- I'm not sure how it's passed on, because when you see haflinger crosses, they are NOT flaxen.
     
  8. Blistering Winds

    Blistering Winds Senior Member+

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    That theory tells me that the halflingers may be Homozygous for the recessive trait of the flaxen manes/tails......and when crossed...other breeds DON"T carry that gene, or if they do, it isn't often.

    So since the flaxen is seeming to be "recessive" it is masked in the cross.
     
  9. Little Red Dun

    Little Red Dun Senior Member+

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    DISCLAIMER: Not an expert and my apologies if I bungle something up!

    All horses are either black or red based, everything else is considered a modifier or patterns as I understand it.

    If the horse is chestnut/sorrel, then they are red-based and homozygous for the red/chestnut gene (basically their foals will always get one red gene from them). Other red-based colors are palominos and red duns.

    If a horse is bay or black, they are black-based. They may be heterozygous black (one red gene, one black gene) or homozygous black (two black genes so they always pass on a black gene to their foals). The only way to know if the horse has one or two copies of black is to test them; you can't tell by looking. A black horse is simply that black in color. A bay horse is black horse with the agouti modifier, which restricts the black to the "points". Other black-based colors are grullas, zebra duns, buckskins, and smoky blacks.

    Some modifiers include agouti (which makes black horses bay), dun (makes dun horses), cream (makes palomino, buckskins, etc.), and champagne.

    Some patterns are sabino, tobiano, splash white, roan, and rabicano. Patterns are basically white "markings" that "cover" the base color.

    So, to make it super simple. If the horse is chestnut/red (under whatever modifiers or patterns they have), then the horse is red-based. If the horse is anything other than chestnut/red, then the horse is black-based.
     
  10. Little Red Dun

    Little Red Dun Senior Member+

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    Here's a good site with some basic information and some pictures on horse colors: Mustang * Horse Colors

    Its based on mustangs, but the genetics of color aren't really affected by breed. For example, a palomino is always a chestnut with one cream gene no matter if the horse is a Quarter Horse, Mustangs, Miniature Horse, or anything else.:)
     






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