Blue (cobalt) salt blocks

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by BuddyPalAmiga, Jan 13, 2009.

  1. BuddyPalAmiga

    BuddyPalAmiga Senior Member+

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    Anybody use them for their horses, or know if you can? I was at the feed store the other day getting new salt and mineral blocks for my girls and the guy recommended getting a cobalt salt block too since they are chewing on my tack shed. When it was way below zero here, they were camping out down at the shed and someone (I'm sure I can guess who) started chewing on the shed. I'm not sure if she is the only one doing it, but I'm sure another one saw her doing it and thought it looked like fun:) (They are all a bunch of followers) Since it has warmed up, I haven't noticed any new chewing, but I thought I'd put the blue block out too if it was ok. I already put out the mineral and white salt block because I always keep them in the pasture, I just wanted to check on this other one before I put it in with them:) Thanks

    Beth
     






  2. BuddyPalAmiga

    BuddyPalAmiga Senior Member+

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    Anybody? I'd really like to know:)
     
  3. IndraAmber

    IndraAmber Senior Member+

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    I know people that use those salt blocks, but I know nothing more then that. Sorry.
     
  4. Beau

    Beau Senior Member+

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    If you already have a mineral block, and a salt block, you really don't need to add in another salt block. The red blocks have more then enough salt to meet their needs, you don't even need the white one. It won't hurt them to put out a blue block, but it's totally unnecessary. Their wood chewing could be due to a mineral deficiency, but it could also be from boredom. If you're worried about it being a deficiency, I'd suggest trying either loose mineral, or even better, mixing it into their rations.
     
  5. BuddyPalAmiga

    BuddyPalAmiga Senior Member+

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    Thanks you guys! I appreciate your input:)
     
  6. ejforrest

    ejforrest Senior Member+

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    Colbalt salt: Horses have a very low requirement(0.1ppm for all horses). Blue colbalt salt blocks containing not less than 100ppm are on the market, and it appears likely that they could supply a horses needs. But in most cases, this wouldnt be necessary"
    "Building Blocks?"
    www.thehorse.com/viewarticle.aspx?ID=5154
     
  7. SaskAndi

    SaskAndi Full Member

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    An old cowboy once told me that a cheap way to stop cribbing is to paint a light layer of used tractor oil onto the fence or wood that your horse is chewing on, and they won't even touch it after. Since it is your barn, it might not look good to paint it on there, but this is just a cheap method that works.
     
  8. nicz2cu

    nicz2cu Senior Member+

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    Just curious, since you stated that it happens mostly in cold weather..... do they have hay at all times ?
     
  9. pantha11

    pantha11 Senior Member+

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    Sorry, but this old Cowboy gave you incorrect information.....my horse nearly died from such a thing...she got toxic poisoning from chewing on post that wher painted with tractor oil.

    You could however try spraying/placing white vinager on the area's they can get to.
     
  10. blair399

    blair399 Senior Member

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    Blue salt licks have very few benefits for horses. The best kind is the plain white ones, which is straight salt. I doubt it'll stop the chewing. Have you considered a cribbing collar?
     






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