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Featured Bits for Starting Colts

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Touch the Sky, Dec 18, 2016.

  1. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    No dear, I trained Western horses under my Uncle's apprenticeship for eight years long before I trained STBs. We re-trained, trained and finished them.

    Horses are horses, you don't get this.
     
  2. HayleyS

    HayleyS Senior Member

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    I am in the camp of liking to start horses in a halter or sidepull, then graduating to a bit later in the training. I go to a snaffle when I do graduate to a bit.

    As far as not all horses liking certain bits: Nikao rode fine in a snaffle for years. Then when he lost the majority of his vision he got much happier in a broken curb. He will still ride in a snaffle, but relaxes more in the curb. So normally when I ride now that is what I ride in. He was also a very picky horse about finding a bit he liked when I did transition to one. We finally settled on a sweet iron snaffle with copper inlays.
     
  3. dumbjockey

    dumbjockey Senior Member

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    For what it is worth, if any one even cares..... This I did. Very consistantly as in 6 days a week if possible. Colts/fillies were taught to be handled, leading etc. What we did, those I was trained by and what I did for years, was this. After a young filly or colt was taught the basics we just let them wear a smooth snaffle in the stall for a bit. Clipped ot even just tied to the halter. Could be a smooth one etc. French link or even a seal tex wrapped rope. You could do this in a paddock where a horse could not get hung up. Just a couple of hours a day, every day for some time. By the time the horse was started in lines, meaning ground driving. The bit was no issue, as they were used to it. .This will help if have a horse that has been hurt by a bit also, no matter their age. A horse that has been hurt by a bit at some time can be very hard to gain back their trust. They learn to accept it, I found over the years this way. Then it is up to the trainer to teach the aids. The more work you do the lighter the response can be. When I had a horse who was bit shy I started all over. Just like he was a baby. After he got used to a bit in his stall/ paddock round pen. I went to ground driving, having made sure he knew to lunge, in the round pen first, of course. This made it easier as there was no anxiety of a rider...then I moved to on riding. Now In Saddle seat the contact is light..very light like with reining. But I had to make money to survive so I was not limited to Saddlebreds. I got a few off the track Thoroughbreds over the years and lots Standardbreds, many quarter horses some TWH...and lots of hackney ponies. Some I had no clue what they were. Most owners were going to be taking them home so it was important they were taught as well. I had 40 acres, and indoor round pen and a huge long hall way . I realize most do not have this luxury. But you can improvise. Honestly, I have had horses that came in that wore hackmores bosals etc. they were fine but the owners of some needed more control. Those that were fine were very gentle. And yes, there are some that are ok in them. But I guess I am a dinosaur like manes. I prefer a horse that will except a bit. Especially outside like on a trail or else.
     
  4. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    Here's my take on it.
    I start with rope halter then snaffle.
    However, I'm not into just "making" my horse tolerate or deal with something. I used to be like that.
    My mare doesn't like to be groomed or brushed in a certain way. Oh, sure, I can MAKE her tolerate it and just stand there and deal with it. But, why the hell would I do that when I can brush her with the brush she prefers and brush her how she prefers and make the experience of being groomed more enjoyable for HER? It's not all about the human. And, that is what needs to be kept in mind.
    Any jackass human with a little bit of horse knowledge can make or force a horse do something by fear and opression. That is NOT how I want to be with my horses. If the horse doesn't like a snaffle, which is entirely possible due to varying horses and shapes of mouths, then you find a bit or bitless set up that will work. Why do you think there are a kazillion different kinds of bits? To me, more skill is shown by accommodation...there is a word in Sanskrit called "kshanti" it means cheerful accommodation with patience and kindness. Now, I'm certainly not perfect with it, but I give it a try everyday. Sometimes I fail and revert to my old ways out of ignorance or misunderstanding (frustration begins where knowledge ends) but I regret it because I know there is a better way even if my knowledge sometimes runs out.
    I ain't riding the face, anyway.
    We are ALL still learning. And, if you ever think you know it all about horses, you can bet your ass one is eventually gonna come along and school ya.
     
    HunterEq95, foxtrot, ~tiffy~ and 3 others like this.
  5. dumbjockey

    dumbjockey Senior Member

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    ummm... it was training... not fear or oppression. If any of you may have thought I was implying that. I wasn't. And for what it's worth, you never ride a Saddlebred's face. I never trained any horse that way either. The contact is as light as a reining horse and the bits never pull a horse into frame on a Saddlebred. They are headed anyway. You try that and you will get schooled. If it was't in reference to my post, BM of Kentucky, my apologies. The main reason for my response is that nothing should ever be forced. If you get resistance, go back until the horse understands. I would never want any one to think that you should just get a horse to just tolerate something. Properly trained they are happy. No oppression.. You want the horse happy, willing.... and I was not knocking a side pull, hackmore or anything like that. This was just what worked for me. The post was to help any one you may choose this option.
     
  6. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    C'mon now @dumbjockey you ought to know that if I'm responding to you or referring to you that I will quote you or respond directly. I don't take cheap shots like that. Didn't even read your post til after I posted mine. We posted like 2 minutes apart. It's not just saddlebreds, but all horses...we do not ride the face but the body.
     
    Alsosusieq2 likes this.
  7. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    No, you don't get that that there are many different ways to skin a cat, or in this case, train a horse.

    The most important thing I think I've learned about horses in general is this: they don't read the handbook.

    While a horse is a horse and there is a large degree of predictability, there are also horses who didn't read the handbook.

    And there are also multiple correct ways to deal with the "textbook" stuff. And much of it is just as valuable as everything else. And some of it won't work with every horse.

    That's life. Few things are truly black and white.
     
    Sam C. likes this.
  8. Friesiangirl

    Friesiangirl Senior Member

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    If it works, it works. I've seen horses turn out just fine started in a halter.
    Seen horses started in a bit that were idiots.

    *shrugs*

    It's not rocket science.
     
  9. dumbjockey

    dumbjockey Senior Member

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    The common denominator is the human. My opinion is that while certain horses have certain temperament, what make them reactive is how the human treats them.Then what temperament the horse has, for the intended training goal. How well the person doing the training, knows horse training... and how well they have been instructed in training. And I have seen some fairly novice riders do a good job by using common sense. Some horses temperament is perfect for bit less riding. Yep. I agree it's not rocket science. Yet still so perplexing when so many people can not grasp the logic of training and fail so often. You would not believe the the stuff I have seen over all those many years.... Or the lack of what I encountered! Just when I thought I had seen it all, another surprise.. Any way this ends my visit here. I hope every has a very Merry Christmas or what ever holiday you celebrate... and a Happy New year. . :D
     
  10. dumbjockey

    dumbjockey Senior Member

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    A cheap shot? I do not take cheap shots at others on this forum. Did you further read what else I wrote? I think it was very evident I did not take said cheap shot. I am also not a mind reader. There was nothing intended toward you, negatively. Rather any other reader who may have misinterpreted my post, if that is what you had done. My main point was to be thorough so as not to misinform.. I am also an extremely fast reader. And certainly did not notice your time.
     
    RockingHorse and manesntails like this.

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