Bit Wrap

Discussion in 'Tack & Equipment' started by Flying Change, Jun 23, 2010.

  1. Flying Change

    Flying Change Senior Member

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    Does it work? What's your opinion on it?

    Diesel does not take a bit to save his life. His teeth are fine and he's fine once the bit gets IN his mouth, he just doesn't want to open it to let me get it in. >< I usually have to put him in a stall and back him in a corner and even then it takes me a good 10 or 15 minutes to get it in.

    He also won't spit it out. He clamps his jaw shut and tosses his head like "get this thing out of my mouth!" but he doesn't open his mouth. But that's a whole different issue.


    So yes - bit wrap. Anyone use it/has used it?
     






  2. crayon

    crayon Senior Member+

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    I wouldn't back him into a corner... That's just asking for a horse to be afraid of bitting up. Really make sure he isn't getting jabbed in the mouth by mistake during rides or tacking up/down. Sometimes wrapping the bits work, but the latex also creates friction and can rub the horse. There is also the possibility that the wrap will make the bit too thick to comfortably fit in the horse's mouth.
     
  3. Flying Change

    Flying Change Senior Member

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    See, we didn't at first. But then if we don't, he takes off high speed BACKWARDS.

    Thanks for the thoughts on the wrap though.
     
  4. jengersnap

    jengersnap Senior Member

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    Wrapping bits is mostly a dated practice from before the time of "happy mouth", rubber or other soft covered bits. Can you try one of those first? You can wrap a bit, certainly, but as crayon points out you might end up with a bigger, stickier, rougher bit in the end.

    Alternately, you might try this:

    http://www.lickitybits.com/Bit-Wraps_c8.htm

    But I've never used them nor seen them in use. They just seem interesting.

    A third option is practice opening the mouth and inserting something very soft, like a cotton rope in the diameter of a bit mouthpiece. In and out, maybe flavor it with something tasty, get him use to accepting, seating, and letting it go.

    A fourth consideration is wolf teeth or general toothfairy checkup. You didn't mention how old he is, but if he has his wolf teeth they could be interfering with comfortable carrying of the bit. He may even benefit from a bit seat if your dentist deems it appropriate.

    And last but never least, make sure it's the right sized bit for the mouth. Do the string test to see just how big or small the mouthpiece should be, and see if he's getting that with your current bit.
     
  5. Javanewt

    Javanewt Senior Member+

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    Next time your vet is out, have a look in his mouth. Make sure you not only have the correct width, but that the bit matches his tongue, palette, etc.

    When you know what will fit his mouth well, try a Happy Mouth or Nathe bit.

    I would not wrap a bit.

    Trying the soft things first is a good idea. You can soak a roap in apple juice or similar so that he thinks having something in his mouth is good:)
     
  6. MyBelgianAzzy

    MyBelgianAzzy Senior Member+

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    Save money and buy fruit by the foot snacks at your local grocery store before trying lickity bits. I would also try Fruit By The Foot on your regular bit, or on a Happy Mouth.
     
  7. myhorsefaith

    myhorsefaith Senior Member

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    yep- or i take a fruit roll up, cut it in half while it is still rolled, and then use 1/2 of it to wrap around the center. And sometimes I may just eat the other half :p
     
  8. crayon

    crayon Senior Member+

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    There has to be something wrong with either his mouth, the bit, or your riding to make him want to avoid it so much... The fact that he will back up full speed concerns me. :/ You dont happen to have a video of that, do you? Or a video of him being ridden?
     
  9. Comida

    Comida Senior Member+

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    I've used the Lickity Bits before....and yes, a fruit rollup snack would work just as well.
    Our boy had severe fear issues with the bit because of his previous owner. I also used my hand to put pressure on his poll, and ask him to lower his head, before I would bridle or unbridle. It became a neat trick to calm him down even if he was ******** out about something scary. Asking him to lower his head made him retrieve his brains and calm down. ;)

    The only downside to wrapping your bit with lickety bits or fruit rollup is that it makes a bit of a mess, your horse will have strangely colored spit (ours was red and everyone thought his mouth was bleeding) and they work the bit a little too much to get the treat. It's worth a shot...but I just wouldn't use it on a long-term basis or your horse might develop the habit of constantly playing with the bit.
     
  10. Native Winds

    Native Winds Senior Member+

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    I have used and will still occasionaly use the Sealtex wrap. Usualy to thicken up a bit if needed or to soften up a metal bit a little if needed. It all depends on the horse and what needs to be done. If I have a horse that needs something else other than a little wrap I will put in a rubber or nylon flexi bit.

    Sounds like he has some other issue going on though. Size of the bit does matter including diameter of the barrels and type of mouth peice and if there is pinching at the corners. Clanging the bit against the teeth can be real issue. Take a spoon and rap it against your teeth and notice how dreadfull that can feel....somthing elso to think about is pallete shallowness, teeth (like wolfteeth) gums (disease like gingivitis though not that prevelant in horses but it can still happen) ulcers in the mouth, blisters, bit to loose or to tight, the list can be endless.
     






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