Biomechanics...engage the core...lift the back

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by BluemoonOKy, Mar 9, 2017.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I don't think it's a complete myth. I don't think people realize that the horse has four legs, sometimes, LOL, the front legs do SOMETHING when the horse is doing collected work, LOL. But I do see more balanced horses, and they are lasting longer. So, no, I don't agree that it's completely a myth.
     
  2. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    Well, since @slc and @Garfield70 and @D_BaldStockings think the stretching is too extreme, let's see you post some examples of correct...or better yet...of you working a horse correct.
    It is a balancing act and the first part is relaxation and seeking contact. Everyone and every horse is at different places
     
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  3. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Yes!
     
  4. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Those horses are not seeking contact, they are manipulated into an unnatural position. And while this position is certainly less uncomfortable than for example rollkur, it's still not natural for a horse to walk, trot, canter for prolonged times with their noses below their knees while it's perfectly normal that a horse walks, trots or canters for a prolonged time with it's nose slightly below the level of the withers.

    First rule: In horse training everything extreme is suspicious.


    Here for example we have a horse trotting in it's pasture in a natural, relaxed head position.



    Now one could want the horse to moderately lower the head/neck to stretch, or later in the training to raise them for collection, as well as round the neck more, but fundamentally, there is nothing wrong with riding a horse in this natural head/neck position. It's balanced and not unhealthy for the spine or something.
     
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  5. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Urging an unnatural headset for a prolonged time is not relaxing for the horse.

    If this was so comfortable for horses, they would do it by themselves.
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I think you're implying that it's 'natural' because his nose is poked forward. I'd say it's more of a working position, but I wouldn't usually want the horse to poke his head forward this much all the time.

    I did ride one horse in his position as her 'working position' because she had had a severe injury to her neck and that was the most comfortable position for her. The injury was healed but she had lost some flexibility in her neck in that area.
     
  7. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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  8. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    I think everyone has missed the freaking point...typical hgs-mhf stuff. The point is why we want a lifted back and engaged core rather than hollow backed and not relaxed. Does anyone get that at all?
     
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  9. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Yup, I am guilty of not reading the ongoing debate, because this seems very simple to me, and I feel as ever there are people who just like to argue for the sake of it.
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    He's the real deal.

    And this is nothing more than the simplest good basic training of dressage. Schmidt is a simple 'fundamentalist' classical dressage trainer. It doesn't get any simpler - or any better - than how he does it.

    It's absolutely wonderful to watch him ride or teach.

    He's an incredible guy.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017

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