Biomechanics...engage the core...lift the back

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by BluemoonOKy, Mar 9, 2017.

  1. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    Why is it important to ask the horse to engage his/her core and lift their back ? Why is important to ride in a particular way, to ask the horse to carry themselves in a particular way, and to examine your own position and core strength? Why create space between the vertebrae and flexibility both longitudinally and latitudinally ?
     
  2. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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  3. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    You don't get off their backs. If you weigh 150 pound, this weight will not suddenly disappear when you ride in two point.

    Just in two point the saddle will determine how the weight is distributed front to back, you can only give left-right weight aids. If you sit in the saddle you can do a a lot more with your weight, that includes giving very nuanced weight aids while not bothering the horse, but also annoying the heck out of your horse if you are a stiff as a board, clumsy as a sack of potatoes etc.
     
  4. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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    endurgirl likes this.
  5. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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    Two point keeps concussion to a minimum, like springs/shocks in a car. The weight on the horse's back/ wheels on the road is the same, but the impact is reduced. Thus the name buckboard for an unsprung wagon.

    How many horses are unhappy when a rider is trying to learn sitting trot... or going with a canter? Like everything else, it has its' place and time. And that isn't 100%.
     
  6. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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    Try an experiment: stand in your stirrups until you are off the horse's back and keep your torso as upright as possible (use a loose rein so as not to give additional signals); then lean forward into a crouch while you are still above the saddle.

    Every horse I've seen will accelerate when a rider does this.
    No, I don't know why, but I have to go with the reality that it does affect the horse's forward balance despite the rider not touching the saddle, over any theory that it shouldn't.
     
  7. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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  8. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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  9. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Peanut rolling from the English side... :D

    Teaching the horses to stretch long and low is certainly very important but I get the impression that these folks are overdoing it. More of a good thing is not always better, there is a point where more of a good thing start to make things worse. Plus they use gimmicks to "set" the head this way....

    I don't see why a horse without kissing spines should be excessively worked in a position that low and the horses that were supposed to show collected exercises were not really collected well.

    Another riding ideology....
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017
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  10. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    What are you talking about? I didn't see any gadgets. The point was to explain why the back should be engaged and not hollow. Very simple. Did you even bother to watch it or just waiting to jump on the next thing you don't agree with...per your typical MO.
    @D_BaldStockings of course cross training is always beneficial. An extremely well trained horse should be able to do it all.
     

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