Big Changes

Discussion in 'Equestrian Events, Shows, Competitions' started by horse luvr1, May 11, 2017.

  1. horse luvr1

    horse luvr1 Senior Member

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    I have been away from the forum for a while and a bunch has happened. And I also have some new big changes coming. I basically need some horse people to talk this through and make sure I'm not crazy. (Sorry for the book)

    So I bought a nice invitation only show gelding for the all around last january of 2016. I had him at a trainer close to me but we had a lot of issues (I believe I posted a thread about the issues) and after a huge blow up, we finally left this January. I now have him at a trainer 3 hours away and this trainer is very different, good, but complete opposite of my other trainer. He's extremely nit picky and precise with everything. Which is good for me, but can be very taxing.

    The problem is I'm getting burned out on showing. The constant expenses, constant expectations to win, and with few rewards. My horse happens to have this thing that you can practice over and over until it's perfect, and then when you go to compete his brain leaves and everything you've worked on is gone. It happens in all of his classes. It's incredibly frustrating. I put in the practice hours, we ride in the arena at 3 am, we've tried ear plugs... both my trainer and I are stumped as to how to stop it. We thought that he might be sensing me being tense and nervous so we worked on that, and it still happens. And with the money that we're spending, we can't afford not to do well. This is just the most recent of my runs into bad luck also. And to make things more complicated, I'm a senior and my youth career will soon be ending. My trainer is one hour away from my college but the expense of training, showing, and college combined is HUGE.

    To add on top of that, one of my worst fears was happening; I was losing my love of horses. My normal desire to ride and better myself was gone. All the hours, work, and determination I had put into showing felt useless. I used to be counting down the days until shows, and now I dreaded them.

    In the meantime, I had a practice with my horse at home, Roanie, and I figured I better ride her atleast once before then. I pulled her out of the pasture and I wanted to remember what it felt like to ride horses for fun, so I hopped on her bareback and rode. As cliche as it sounds, the second I loped on her bareback all of my love and desire for horses came back. And this is when I came up with my crazy idea. Instead of keeping my shows horse, I would sell him and bring Roanie with me to college and try showing ranch horse. My ultimate goal is to be involved in horse training in some way, and if I get out of horses, I don't think I'll get back in it for a long time because I won't find it feasible to add the expense of a horse when I get out of college ect. If I do this I will gain knowledge in ranch horse which is gaining more and more popularity, which gives me more training experience. There are also many more trainers in the ranch horse discipline near my college than showing. The cost in general is much lower for board, show clothes, and tack. The other option of moving my show horse to be without a trainer does not make sense (money wise) to me because the highest price he will ever be oh is right now, unless I put him back into training which is unlikely. So I need to sell him now. And the amateur division in the 'show' classes is decreasing in number and competitiveness. While Ranch horse is booming in popularity. (In my state)

    So how will I turn my first horse into an aqha show ranch horse? I have found trainers at my planned college to help me and a boarding place with an indoor, outdoor, and round pen. With my first trainer, she often times made me do her work for her, which gave me he opportunity to ride and train some awesome reiners and go from start to finish with many different prospects. Also got to show ranch horse several times. So I'm using that knowledge and starting roanie over and acting like she's a young prospect. We went back to the snaffle and we're relearning all the basics. With only a week and a half we have come leaps and bounds. This is also a way of proving to myself that I can train a horse as she continues to get better and better. Big focus is going slow into this so I don't ruin her nor I. I'll take her to a couple cheap shows away from home this summer and get her used to being away from home and the show atmosphere. She's extremely smart and level headed so she should adjust well. I have a bunch of questions about showing ranch horse and might start another thread for that.
    Thank you all for reading, I needed to put my ideas to writing. Enjoy a picture of Roanie :)
     

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  2. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    It sounds like your show horse might have ulcers with all the perfection your trainer wanted and that's what burned you out too.

    Agree you probably should sell your pleasure horse now and make sure you have him priced to sell. Have known too many people that price their horses too high and end up not being able to sell them for years because they won't budge on price. Some finally ended up selling them super cheap, donated them, or leased them out.

    Good luck with the ranch riding.
     
  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    what I believe, what I truly believe, is in all that coaching and riding, no one ever taught you how to compete. Because every single thing you've written here, about competing is WRONG. You clearly don't understand it. At all.

    At the same time, you're over-competitive and have unrealistic expectations, of the horse, really. You expect the horse to just do it and then you'll win. You expect to win after a couple months' work, and because you've spent money. It doesn't work that way.


    'The constant pressure to win'? That's not how people who keep showing, think about it.

    The thing is, it isn't a constant pressure to beat other people that keeps people showing for years and years.

    It's the desire to better oneself.

    If what you want to do is win, you will always fail, because there is always some way or another, that you can lose. There will always be a bigger show, or someone who can afford more coaching, or a better coach, or a better horse, or who has more time to practice, or who 'cheats'.

    Also, what's this, 'I worked my butt off for a few months and now I expect to beat everyone' nonsense? Come on. You're competing against people who have been riding for 40 years! And you always will be!

    Compete against yourself? And expect SLOW progress, not perfection after a few months!

    I showed on horses that were 'worthless', that I was never going to win with, ever, for years, and I showed as much as I could afford, and would have shown more if I could have afforded it. Why? Because it was never about beating someone else for me. I just wanted to better myself.

    Your situation where the horse does something wrong in the ring? I would think, okay, he does it wrong, I can't fix it, I still get the experience of showing, and I learn to relax and focus, which I need for every aspect of my life anyway, so, so what?

    But no matter what the horse is doing, yeah, it can be corrected. You just THINK it can't be. Get someone different helping you. As it is you're too emotional about it to even say what the problem is in public. That is just not good.

    You really need to learn to relax and stop taking yourself so seriously. It's not whether you win or lose anyway, it's how you play the game.

    Why do you have to win? Because you're spending money? That's a crazy idea. Really. It is.

    You don't win just because you spend money. NOTHING in this world works that way.

    You BETTER win because you're spending money? That's irrational, totally, and completely unreasonable thing to say. And you don't HAVE to win BECAUSE you're spending money either. That isn't how THAT works either.

    Again, why do you have to win? Are you planning on going pro or something? Then you need to go about it a very, very different way. This is not the way to do that. If you want to go pro, sell your horse and stop showing. Ride 16 horses a day as a working student for ten years. Then start as a little local trainer, and maybe some day you're competing locally/regionally. Yeah, that's how hard it is to go pro.

    In other words, it's YOU putting the pressure on YOU. No one else. The trainer pushes you? So what? You just ignore him and do the showing, and just ride happy, which means you do the work, and the moment before you go in the ring, you take your horse's bridle and hold it and say, 'I hereby forgive you for whatever crazy awful or wonderful thing happens in that ring'. Then you go in there and put your heart and soul into it, every ounce you have in you. And then you come out and grin at the world and give your horse a pat and say, 'It's Miller Time!' You don't give yourself the luxury of regrets, or beating yourself up, or any of that crazy stuff. What happens in there happens, and then it's done. THAT is how you enjoy showing.

    In other words, showing is all about developing character and maturity.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2017
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  4. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Everything that you write suggests selling your competition horse is the best move....neither of you are enjoying competing, time to quit. It is meant to be fun, win or lose, but it just sounds like expense and stress to me.

    Simplify reduce your costs, enjoy your mare, just have fun.
     
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  5. VermilionStrife

    VermilionStrife Senior Member

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    I agree. You're not enjoying it and your horse isn't either, so it's time to sell. Some horses don't like the lifestyle. Could also be what LoveTrail suggested. My guy gets more anxious when he needs a round of ulcer treatment.
     
  6. .Delete.

    .Delete. Senior Member

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    Out of curiosity, does this horse do the same thing with the trainer in the show pen? And by writing this post I think you've answered your own question and you just need some validation.
     
  7. horse luvr1

    horse luvr1 Senior Member

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    Yes, I know for sure he does the same in the pleasure, but Ive never had another person show him in horsemanship. Would be interested in to how they would say he acted

    I've ruled out ulcers because it happens in a second. They'll have the arena open during lunch break and he'll be going around perfectly, the ask everyone to exit and call in my class and he turns into a completely different horse
     

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