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Big belly showing ribs?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Rae, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. SteelDustRose

    SteelDustRose Registered

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    As a general rule, a horse needs 2 to 2.2 pounds of feed for every 100 pounds of body weight. (You can buy a weight tape to measure how much your horse weighs.) For example, an average 1000 lb horse would need 20 to 25 pounds of feed a day. Most of that should be hay. A typical diet for a horse being ridden for one hour five days a week would be 2 to 5 pounds of grain and 15 to 20 pounds of hay a day, split into at least two separate meals.

    On a final note... It sounds like your horse needs to be wormed.

    Let us know how things work out afterwards.

    :)
     
  2. Rae

    Rae Senior Member+

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    She has been dewormed this evening.

    Thanks so much for the help, I appreciate it. :)
     
  3. Rae

    Rae Senior Member+

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    Okay, now I'm reading conflicting worming times. When should they be dewormed? The last time she was was late September, I just read where someone worms only 4 times a year? If that's acceptable, then, she's NOT overdue on worming.
     
  4. JustiaOneSecret

    JustiaOneSecret Full Member

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    My farm worms every three months.
     
  5. horsegent

    horsegent Senior Member+

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    shakes head in despair :no: :no: :no: :no: :no:
     
  6. Rae

    Rae Senior Member+

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    12-14 weeks seems to be the norm. She was done late September, therefore, this worming was right on time.

    Could her belly still be from worms? She was not on a regular worming schedule before I got her, I'm just guessing by the shape she was in when I got her. The guy I got her from bought her at auction and wormed her when he brought her home, but when I got her mid-August, he said he'd had her "about three months". Her coggins from the auction was dated March. So, let's say she was wormed in March, then again in September, would she have a large wormload? If so, they must be immune to ivermectin, which is what I used last time, and again this evening.
     
  7. Rae

    Rae Senior Member+

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    Is there any way you could be helpful as opposed to condescending?
     
    Peg D likes this.
  8. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    In some areas of the country, and some management practices, every 3 months is fine. It all depends on where the horse came from what the parasite management was, the current situation, etc.
     
  9. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    For those getting all over the OP about forgetting to deworm - have you NEVER forgotten to do something that you only do a handful of times a year? It's unlikely the even remotely conscientious owner would forget to feed their horse(s) :rolleyes: but come on, even big boarding barns can forget to deworm for a couple of weeks.

    Rae, something else to think about, besides a growth spurt, is that she may need a daily probiotic for a while. What condition is her hay in? Is it all stemmy, or nice and leafy? When were her teeth last checked? A pot belly doesn't have to be from a parasite load, it can be from poor hay.

    OR, it can be from a horse eating so much hay in order to satisfy mineral cravings. Not all horses get "fat" on too much hay, but they can develop a hay belly.
     
  10. Rae

    Rae Senior Member+

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    I wish I knew what type we feed. I don't know how it is elsewhere, but around here, there are two available types: as we call them, the "good" kind and the "bad" kind. The "good" is nice and green, fresh, smells wonderful. The "bad" is brown, looks nasty, I know I wouldn't want to eat it if I was a horse. That's also the cheaper stuff. We feed the good, fresh green stuff. Her teeth haven't been checked since I've gotten her, but the guy I got her from had them checked, and they were "good", according to him. She's in the process of being gentled and she's still learning the basics, as am I, so it's going slowly.

    I'll adjust this later tonight when I have time.
     

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