Best treatment for scratches on fetlocks

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by WildLittleWren, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. CabterCrazy

    CabterCrazy Senior Member

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    If you board you cant just go digging things up. Plus different landscapes and terrain dictate what you can do. You make it seem like its totally simple to just go dig stuff up and it is not like that. @Lopinslow is pointing that out.
     
  2. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    Yup, a few little hand dug trenches is going to completely remove all mud when one gets dumped on.:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

    SLC must have a perfect place, on the top of a hill, with sandy soil that never holds water, and unlimited funds and time to bed and clean stalls so all the horses can be inside and never get their previous feet wet.

    Unforthnately, I don't have any of those luxuries.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
    CabterCrazy likes this.
  3. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    This is actually a law in many US counties, including mine, and if not followed, if it is determined that your mud is causing run off into streams or causing a land slide rise you can be held liable for millions of dollars.

    I am required to keep "sacrifice areas" that have mud free footing I use hoofgrid and gravel which the horses must stay on when it's wet. It cost me more to install this, than it cost to build the barn. I also had to install a $20,000 drainage pond for my arena run off. This is one of the reasons that horse keeping is so expensive in our area.

    As areas become more populated and as building codes get greener I Suspect these requirements will continue to increase and be adopted by other counties.


    I will say that it does work, and it's nice to be mud free for both me and the horses. Far fewer health issues, fewer flies, nice clean horses.
     
  4. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    I have never heard of such a thing. I could see if in a highly dense residential area, but I don't think most areas would fit this.

    we have had over 4 inches of rain in the past 24 hours, and it is STILL raining. mud is simply a fact of life.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2017
  5. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    Our county started this about 20 years ago when Salmon was declared a threatened species. Some counties have done it for mud slide prevention , others for water quality. Rain happens and is necessary... most mud is made by overgrazing and keeping large animals on overgrazed areas. We can't control the rain we have learned how to control the mud.
     
  6. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    Well, I guess I'm an awful horse owner because I can't afford to control all the mud near the barn, shelters and waterer's where the horses congregate.

    I give up
     
  7. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    No one is saying you are a bad horse owner. We are just saying there are ways to prevent horses from making and therefore standing in mud, and someday you may actually be required to do so. I was shocked when I built the barn at the requirements and cost....I took out a loan to do it. Now that it is done I am really am happy with it. Many of the barns around me are stall only,....that's not what I wanted for my horses.
     
  8. MzCarol

    MzCarol Senior Member

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    I'm always skeptical about fly sprays because nothing seems to be keeping them away anymore. Your opinion?
     
  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Oh give it a rest, it's enough already. We have clay and we're broke and the horses get wet all the time.

    And still, we don't have Scratches here. Hosing off their legs is free. So are towels. Bedding and dry stalls are not, but we work at it.
     
  10. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    We have the mud free set up and use fly predators this really helps in keeping the flies down to a minimum. We are close to streams and have a lot of trees so we get killer mosquitos and No See Ums. I run a Mosquito Magnet in the Spring. For spray I find that rotating works best. I rotate between Mosquito off and Equiderma Spray. I have also found that if I spray the stall walls with some equiderma at about 3 feet high it greatly reduces the barn population....and it makes the barn smell marvelous.

    The equiderma is essential oil based, so applying too much can cause the skin to burn/peel and some horses may have an allergic reaction. I would say it's definetly worth getting a bottle and trying it.
     

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