Best ice boots on a budget?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by GONE ROPING, May 3, 2018.

  1. GONE ROPING

    GONE ROPING Senior Member+

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    I'm looking to buy some ice boots for post workout use, since a lot of the time where I ride cold hosing is not an option. What are the best brands? Or brands to stay away from?
     
  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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  3. pippy

    pippy Senior Member

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    Its going to depend on your ability to keep things cold or not really.
    i.e if you have a freezer on you, or just a chilly bin (ice box)... not sure what you call them.

    then that will detail best thing to get for yourself. No point buying "proper" horse ice boots to not be able to keep them cold, so then maybe the wet and "snap" type are better. Or just plain ole bags taped on the leg and filled with ice....
     
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  4. ILuvMyAppyQH

    ILuvMyAppyQH Senior Member

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    Ice pops!
     
  5. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    I love my Ice Vibes, but they aren't good on the budget for just icing, but way cheaper than Game Ready. :)
     
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  6. GONE ROPING

    GONE ROPING Senior Member+

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    I am planning on buying ice vibes later on this summer! For now I'm trying @manesntails idea for the time being.

    How long do your ice vibes stay cold? I hear such varied opinions on them.
     
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  7. Preppy_Ponies

    Preppy_Ponies Senior Member

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    I've used all sorts of ice boots and this style is my favorite by far: Dura-Tech® Cooling Gel Wrap in Cold Therapy. They stay cold for a very long time and they stay put on the horse. There are several different brands that make them but the sstack are my favs. Finn tack/horze also has some decent ones in the same style. The other nice thing is they work well to get ice on places other than legs (back, hips, neck, etc) and when needed they work great for icing humans too;)

    I have the ice vibes but will be selling them soon. I know some people love them but unless you are pulling them straight from the freezer and applying immediately they don't stay cold enough. I did like the shape and how well they stayed put but in order to achieve that they sacrifice any insulation. They're an interesting concept.
     
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  8. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Mine stay colder than the 20 minutes others say. Guessing more like 40 minutes. I do bring them to the barn in a cooler.
     
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  9. hamerface

    hamerface Senior Member

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    Two rubber buckets and a bag of ice ;)
     
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  10. Doug Spatz

    Doug Spatz Registered

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    If your primary goal is to resume intense training or racing immediately, then ice might help you do these things. If however, your primary goal is to speed healing, restore full function and maintain the long-term health of that injured tissue then you need to skip the ice.

    Ice actually reverses lymphatic drainage and pushes fluid back to interstitial space! There was a study published in 1986 that found when ice is applied to a body part for a prolonged period of time; lymphatic vessels begin to dramatically increase permeability. As lymphatic permeability increases fluid will pour from the lymphatics into the injured area, increasing the amount of local swelling. Ice can increase swelling and retard debris removal! Ice essentially stops the free flow of blood and fluids; it causes the contraction of local blood vessels and soft tissue. This may inhibit the restoration of normal circulation, which is critical for healing. Extensive use of ice is believed to cause an arthritic type of pain down the line that is worse with weather changes (especially cold and damp) and is difficult to treat. Ice is considered a major culprit in joint injuries that don’t heal properly.
     

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