Best Build

Discussion in 'Critique My Horse' started by GentleGiant1, Jan 13, 2018.

  1. GentleGiant1

    GentleGiant1 Full Member

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    I have 3 Thoroughbreds off the track and a Trakehner, all of which are geldings. Whose build do you like the best? .
    1. Jackson Square 2009 Dark Bay Thoroughbred. Three starts winning $7,000 and winning in one. Adopted from New Vocations in October for the Pony Club Challenge.

    2. Afternoon Ghost 2012 Grey Thoroughbred. One start placing last with $500 in earnings. Was my 2017 RRP horse in dressage. Also is for sale.

    3. Lincecum 2008 Dark Bay Thoroughbred. War horse in 54 starts and $77,000 in earnings in 5 years. Retired off the track this year and is my 2018 RRP horse for dressage.

    4. Marouk 1996 Dark Bay Trakehner. Intermediare dressage schoolmaster and is the main one I show.
     

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  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    The first picture is really small, I can't see it.

    Of the other 3,the one I would most like to try and work on dressage with, it's really impossible to tell as there are no in motion videos. Give that, it would be the one wearing the light green halter. The one with the white boots on looks like he has the sturdiest bone, but the picture is taken with the camera pointed down, so I can't really tell what his proportions are.

    Lime green halter has more mass in front than behind(big chest, base of neck, head), and the loin looks a little slack and the hock a little straight. I'd expect him to be a little strong in the bridle due to the mass on the front end, and I'd be alert to the possibility that someone could have knocked him off the bit and gotten him crooked, in an effort to have a 'lighter contact'. And he'd need work to help develop his loin and hind quarter. I'd be very wary of backing him a lot or putting too much load on his hocks in other ways.

    White boots has an extremely sloped, short hind quarter, which might be stiff and have a hard time being supple and adjusting from pushing to carrying, but he doesn't have much mass in front, so may balance well, and that hind quarter can be suppled with lots of leg yielding (Introduced slowly to avoid losing rhythm and balance) and cantering.

    White boots has a very straight neck and small head and throat, which could make it hard for him to maintain a contact and have a supple poll(and way too easy to get him behind the bit), and his neck starts low on his body, so I'd really worry about getting him to take a steady contact with the bit and encourage him to hold the base of his neck well by pushing him to the bit.

    White boots has very good bone, so that is a real plus for staying sound during years of training.

    Grey horse is stood down a slope so is hard to really evaluate. Even though he's stood down a slope it still looks like his forelegs are shorter than his hind legs, so I would think a lot about developing overall strength and suppleness so that he can balance by taking a great big step under his body with his hind legs, and lift that front end. That would take time but they say patience is a virtue, LOL.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
  3. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Conformation.
    “Which of my horses has the best ConfOrmation.“?

    Hey, ya have horses so, you need to sound like you know what you're talking about.

    You need proper confo pictures, ( see the sticky with the pushpin, at the top of this forum on Critiques and see how to do that.)

    From THOSE pictures, the one in the lime green halter has “the best conformation“. Produce and post pictures with these horses all standing squarely and on level ground with the camera at the optimum angle, and give us pix from front and rear ( WHO KNOWS if these horses are in at the knee, cow hocked, etc...we have NO pictures from those angles) then the one with the best confo might change.
     
  4. GentleGiant1

    GentleGiant1 Full Member

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    If I was asking for an in depth conformation critique I would have posted proper conformation photos. I’m an HB in Pony Club so I know what I’m talking about. I asked for, based on the photos posted, who had the best build. Which typically means, if you were unaware, the one who seems to be put together nicely. They’re all my horses and I am aware of their faults and downfalls. But thank you for your opinion regardless. :)
     
  5. GentleGiant1

    GentleGiant1 Full Member

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    You just described all of them exactly how they are under saddle. Haha.

    The lime green halter is the war horse and he has 10 rides off the track as of today. He tends to be very strong in the bridle at times, but is very soft mouthed once he relaxes and starts paying attention.

    The bay with white boots is the Trakehner and it’s a constant struggle with getting him to carry himself instead of dragging his body around. Well, at least for me it is because I’m the “green” one in this situation.

    Grey horse tends to have a hard time tracking up and pushing from behind. He likes to travel on the forehand but we are working on balancing him as he gets more fit.
     
  6. GentleGiant1

    GentleGiant1 Full Member

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    Here’s the other bay gelding. Hopefully it works this time.
     

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  7. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Don't show your childishness and lack of respect for elders here on the bulletin board. Do that in front of your little friends whom you think will be all impressed with you.

    If you do not post proper pictures, NO WAY to tell which has better conformation and yes, you ask about the horse's “build“. Don't want to be corrected in future? Then APPRECIATE the fact you got educated about that and won't have to be told, hopefully, again, what term to use in future.
    Would you rather learn correct terminology here, or embarrass yourself in front of a judge?


    Any confo critique that is worth anything comes with proper pictures. We are not obligated to give you a critique off pictures of horses that are not standing square and balanced, waste time making remarks that turn out to be inaccurate because you couldn't be bothered to take proper photos which show the horse as he actually is.
     
  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    "lack of respect for your elders"?

    We're not having a formal dinner with Eleanore Roosevelt here. Further, none of the older people on this board are infallible or omniscient. Even with the best pictures there are no guarantees that a critique is helpful or accurate.

    It's actually extremely difficult to critique conformation, but it's even harder to take good conformation pictures. A lot depends on having a flat smooth place to stand up the horse(many people do not), having a camera that doesn't distort madly when tipped a little bit(many people do not), having a helper that has any idea what makes a good conformation shot(once again....). We have to be a little realistic here.

    I state the shortcomings of the photo only as a way of apologizing for shortcomings in my critique or to see if there might be any other pictures at a different angle(many people have dozens of photos and may not actually post the one that helps evaluate conformation the best).

    As an example, this picture is excellent in many ways. It's aimed at the middle of the horse, the horse is on a flat, level surface where the feet and ankles are in clear view, it's stood up correctly(one hind leg a little back, one foreleg a little forward), the camera itself is not tilted/tipped up or down(which can cause an awful lot of distortion).

    The fact is, that as 'sharp' as cell phone camera pictures are, they are very bad for distortion when taking pictures of LONG TALL things like horses. So a person is always going to struggle to get a good conformation shot with a cell phone.

    The sad fact is that most people don't even HAVE cameras these days, they just use a cell phone.

    But it's I think quite a tall horse, or just shot with the camera positioned slightly low. But it's really a picture I can tell a lot from. Holding the camera down too low tends to make the legs look longer than they are, and it can make the body appear to have more mass than it does. It's a little like me(shorty) taking a picture of Michelangelo's David statue. But you see, here, I KNOW what type of distortion I'm getting. I can, at least to some extent, take that distortion into account.

    Really the worst type of distortion is when the picture-taker sits up on a tall fence and takes a picture looking down at the horse. It makes horses look like daschunds with huge heads. That's pretty hard to overcome. The usual American person is 5'8'' or taller, and too tall to take a picture of a 14.1-15.1 hand horse without crouching a little.
     
  9. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    Respect for elders :rofl:

    I like the grey one the most.
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    The trouble with horses is that age of the human does not always confer...much. The real key with horses is always knowing who to listen to about what, and being able to use that information in a smart way.
     

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