Beginner: Using Outside Rein to Turn

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Avalancheé, Jan 24, 2019.

  1. Avalancheé

    Avalancheé Registered

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    Lol, no the description that I explained was nothing like the dressage video I watched. That’s a mixture of all of the different things I’ve heard and read. The video itself was about using your outside rein and what it is used for. I figured I was missing something critical because I didn’t understand much of the video!
     
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    It's easier if someone demonstrates it. Your inside aids 'bend the horse to the circle' and the outside 'aids 'draw the outside of the cirle line' and 'hold the outside of him on the circle line.'

    Have you seen those oval plastic kitty toys with a channel down the middle? The ball stays in the channel because of the outside of the toy, and the inside of the toy.
     
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  3. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    My description come from my background, stock horses, riding in the western based classes. Frankly, have no idea if different for dressage. Probably is, but have zero experience in that discipline.
     
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  4. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    One of my first Instructors told me a rhyme that I think is really good, especially for beginners just learning the concepts:

    Inside rein is for bend and flexion,
    Outside is for speed and direction.
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I was hoping not to confuse her with the 'speed' part, lol. Her horse probably doesn't know that part anyway. When you 'go there,' you're even starting to talk about half halts, and that's got to be left for much later.

    But you're right. The trouble is it's doing the turns and circles correctly that sets up and teaches the horse that 'the outside rein is for speed and direction.' In other words, you have to do the circles correctly first, that's what makes the horse realize and be able to learn, 'the outside is for speed and direction.'

    Sometimes it helps if you tell people the inside aids make the bend, the outside aids keep the bend from being too much. That's kind of stage 1, and they really have to start with stage 1 and work their way through each stage.

    The plain truth is that most people don't 'get' the outside rein for a long, long time. At Rowe's in Okemos, Michigan there used to be a sign on the wall that said, 'The secret of dressage is in the outside rein,' lol. Once a gal kept running over to the sign yelling 'what does it MEAN?' AHAHAH. Like the guy in 'Close Encounters of the Third Kind.'

    And once a horse is very advanced the rein aids are 'taken over' and even to an extent, replaced, more and more by the seat and leg aids. The rein aids are always there if things go awry(and they often do), but yes, in the upper levels the reins become 'less about direction and more about collection.' That's another little pithy saying, lol.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2019
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  6. bsaz

    bsaz Senior Member

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    For trail riding, you are letting the horse know where you want to go. Then the horse performs the turn. The horse knows how to turn efficiently and effectively. After all, they turn hundreds if not thousands of times a day. If the horse knows neck reining, then it is very simple: Hold the reins in one hand. Move the hand left to go left. Right to go right. Neutral to go straight. I prefer to move my hand a little forward first. Then over. That way, the forward movement lets the horse know the next thing he feels will be a cue to turn.

    You can also turn left by moving the left rein out (an 'opening rein') and tugging it a little if the horse needs more emphasis. Just before that, or simultaneously, move the right leg a little forward and nudge the horse to the left. Before long, a lot of turning can be done with the leg alone.

    Some horse sports want to control every part of the horse's body. After all, there is no "context" to a left turn in an arena - no trail going that way, no opening in the brush, nothing obvious to let the horse know "left" means "turn 30 degrees left because that is where the only opening in the brush is". For those sports, getting the horse to move a certain way is important. On a trail, the horse just needs an idea of where you want to go next. He will pick his exact footing during the turn based on rocks, branches, mud, etc.

    Teaching neck reining:

     
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  7. funkybizniz

    funkybizniz Full Member

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    My explanation to students is that if your horse moves into your outside rein, the outside rein keeps your horse straight and forward. You don’t turn the horse with the outside rein by pulling or releasing, but you give slightly/relax the feel with the outside rein to allow the horse to increase the inside bend and turn.
    If you’re a beginner, I wouldn’t worry about this concept for now. Your trainer should work with you on this eventually, and it should come somewhat naturally if you are riding correctly back to front and inside to outside.
     
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