Banamine as a preventative? You got any stories like this?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by slc, May 7, 2017.

  1. Mirage

    Mirage Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2014
    Messages:
    2,367
    Likes Received:
    3,122
    I agree that's a very stupid and lazy way to do things. But some people (and horses) are just lucky.
    My neighbor use to just throw his horses out to pasture from a dry lot, or go from pasture to dry lot from one day to the next. My first two horses use to belong to him, so they were treated like this too. Feed and hay change was one day to the next.
    None of his horses ever coliced or foundered from it. The only reason one of his mares foundered is because she got into the feed room and ate almost 2 bags of sweet feed by herself.

    It's gets so irritating when you see people like that have no problems, but your horse almost dies even though you're doing your best to do things the right way. :cautious:
     
  2. Mirage

    Mirage Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2014
    Messages:
    2,367
    Likes Received:
    3,122
    I agree that's a very stupid and lazy way to do things. But some people (and horses) are just lucky.
    My neighbor use to just throw his horses out to pasture from a dry lot, or go from pasture to dry lot from one day to the next. My first two horses use to belong to him, so they were treated like this too. Feed and hay change was one day to the next.
    None of his horses ever coliced or foundered from it. The only reason one of his mares foundered is because she got into the feed room and ate almost 2 bags of sweet feed by herself.

    It's gets so irritating when you see people like that have no problems, but your horse almost dies even though you're doing your best to do things the right way. :cautious:
     
  3. Mirage

    Mirage Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2014
    Messages:
    2,367
    Likes Received:
    3,122
    I agree that's a very stupid and lazy way to do things. But some people (and horses) are just lucky.
    My neighbor use to just throw his horses out to pasture from a dry lot, or go from pasture to dry lot from one day to the next. My first two horses use to belong to him, so they were treated like this too. Feed and hay change was one day to the next.
    None of his horses ever coliced or foundered from it. The only reason one of his mares foundered is because she got into the feed room and ate almost 2 bags of sweet feed by herself.

    It's gets so irritating when you see people like that have no problems, but your horse almost dies even though you're doing your best to do things the right way. :cautious:
     
  4. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    17,166
    Likes Received:
    20,157
    Mine are on pasture all winter, so they are able to get used to it slowly as it starts coming up.
     
    Kira and BossMare16 like this.
  5. Ryle

    Ryle Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    Messages:
    6,461
    Likes Received:
    2,410
    No good reason to give Banamine just for changing to pasture.
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    17,941
    Likes Received:
    10,881
    Trouble here is it doesn't 'start coming up'. It's like bang, 3 feet tall and growing like mad, and pastures are too wet to turn out on for some months in spring. So for example I was on a farm in Virginia, great grass country, lush, incredible grass, horses were left on pasture and got laminitis EVERY spring.
     
    RelaxMax likes this.
  7. RelaxMax

    RelaxMax Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2014
    Messages:
    1,714
    Likes Received:
    3,827
    Can confirm, live in Virginia, deal with it every spring.

    It's like it goes from crushed, dead brown grass one day to a beautiful lush field the next and people who don't pay attention just let their horses gorge their way to laminitis.
     
    slc likes this.
  8. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    17,166
    Likes Received:
    20,157
    Luckily we don't have that here. They have been nibbling grass for about a month... and except for the spots the silly things won't touch, nothing is lush yet.... but, that is likely because my pastures desperately need to be reseeded. it hasn't been done due to the cost and the fact that they all do just fine on it.
     
    slc likes this.
  9. mrs.white8389

    mrs.white8389 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Messages:
    796
    Likes Received:
    170
    This is how it is at out place, he is never off grass. But grass grows all year round as we don't get bad winters maybe a few cold nights, growth slows but not much.
     
  10. apndi

    apndi Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2016
    Messages:
    1,080
    Likes Received:
    1,507
    This is such a relief to see, I was reading everyone else's comments and was about to have a nervous breakdown :LOL: "oh no, am I the most horrible ignorant horse owner ever????"

    I live in Charlotte NC, really close to the SC border. The grass around here stays green all year long. My horses are on 24/7 pasture year round. There's really no significant difference in the appearance of the pasture as the year goes on. It's always green and short. In the winter they're given hay twice a day to supplement their grass and grain intake, and they've always maintained their weight fine.
     

Share This Page