Back/Stomach problems with my mare??

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Kandl.EQ, Nov 17, 2017.

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  1. Kandl.EQ

    Kandl.EQ Full Member

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    My mare has started to act up about her stomach area. Normally I would think ulcers or even mild colic could be the culprit, but she only gets angry when you touch her AFTER we’ve ridden, and only in the spots that are sweaty. Even during the ride, she doesn’t react adversely to kicking or squeezing. I’ve clipped her to see if she was ticklish or bothered by the hair in that area and she stood very well when we were clipping, so I’m not sure if she’s ticklish.
    We did recently buy a new girth, but this problem surfaced a few weeks after we switched, so I don’t think that’s the problem?? The main way she reacts is to turn around and bite or swish her tail at me. Please help!! She’s normally so well-mannered on the ground :(
     
  2. Duffy1

    Duffy1 Full Member

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    This could be a large number of things, so just work through them. Ulcers can certainly cause that type of behaviour, but there are usually other clues, such as standing facing the back corner in her stable and grinding her teeth. You could eliminate this as a cause by giving an ulcer treatment and adding an antacid such as bicarbonate of soda to her feed (but it's swabbable because it is used as a masking agent for other drugs, so don't use it if you are going to compete within the next few days) to see if that eases the problem.

    It could be the girth putting pressure on different points from what she's used to - girths can inhibit blood supply and cause nerve damage, but you could add a fleecy protector or other soft protecting device over the girth for a week or so to see if there's a change.

    The fact that she is sweating in certain areas and is sensitive in those areas could indicate that those muscles are having an issue and are very sore. Ensure they are not areas where spurs or heels hit as there can be muscle damage from those that cause issues. If they are under the saddle, check that there aren't pressure points from the saddle that are causing muscle issues - I will use thick memory foam saddle blankets under saddles on horses that show any sign of back problem - they distribute the weight of the saddle evenly and do away with pressure points.

    You could also use something like Tuff-rock on the regions that sweat - at lots of our national and state shows you'll see horses with that slapped all over sore muscles to help them, and I use it on myself, Magic stuff.

    The fact that she is only having areas of sweating rather than general sweating, could indicate sore muscles in that area OR it could be an indication of partial anhidrosis, and that is always worth considering in any horse that doesn't sweat generally.

    I've heard of increasing numbers of horses with enterolyths in their intestinal tracts, and one of the symptoms can be 'ulcer like' behaviour during or after work because the enterolyth (a ball of minerals forming around something like a tiny bit of hayband or pebble in the gut, they can grow to four or five pound balls of solid mineral stone) sits heavy and still until exercise starts it shaking up the gut. One of my friend's dressage horses started displaying bad behaviour after half an hour of riding, and crankiness, and snappiness after exercise, and eventually, colic like symptoms - he had colic surgery and several enterolyths were removed, including one massive six pound ball - the horse must have had agonising pain with exercise and he'd been putting up with it.

    So, lots of possible causes, plus more than what I've covered, so just start working through them. Consulting with a vet is a good idea, as they might prescribe pain killers for a week to see if there is an underlying issue that is causing pain, also a good muscle therapist can help.

    Good luck with it.
     
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  3. PyroTekNik333

    PyroTekNik333 Senior Member

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    Sore back after riding?
    Check saddle fit.
     
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  4. XxLiveToRidexX

    XxLiveToRidexX Senior Member

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    I'd be interested to know if the saddle fits properly.
     
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  5. Kandl.EQ

    Kandl.EQ Full Member

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    Yes, it does. She’s been using the same saddle size for years, and she’s 14 so there’s no growing left to do. This isn’t even just the same saddle size, it’s the exact same saddle she’s been using forever. I’ve just recently bought all the stuff that Duffy suggested, and it seems to be helping her so far? I think she could also just be in heat.
     
  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Have you bought a new pad for that 14years of riding saddle? Pads wear out and horses become more sensitive with age, or CAN become more sensitive and a new girth and a real sheepskin cover for it might solve the issue.

    If not, you need a Vet to see what's going on. Things happen when nobody's looking and horses hurt themself.
     
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  7. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    She can still change with age and if her weight and/or muscle changes. My horse at five doesn't look the same back wise as he does at 15.

    16251671_10158046056300431_8389855232109574685_o-2.jpg 23473163_10159469080600431_696694155412988071_n.jpg
     
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  8. Kandl.EQ

    Kandl.EQ Full Member

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    Ahh sorry I didn’t see this. I had a vet come check her saddle set-up and he said it’s perfect, so nothing there. Sorry for the late reply rip
     
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  9. Kandl.EQ

    Kandl.EQ Full Member

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    Sorry for the late reply. I’ve been inactive.
    I bought a new saddle and it didn’t do much to help. She has a sheepskin girth, a gel halfpad, and a full theraputic pad from back-on-track. She’s still acting up. The vet checked everything and said the saddle was perfect for her. He said she could just be marish? As it gets warmer this is becoming less of a problem. I’m having a physical therapy lady down for her next week to do acupuncture, chiropractics, etc. to see if it helps. What do you think?
    She was on Previcox for a few weeks. It didn’t really solve anything either. I’ve heard sometimes horses react to that med differently, though. I still have no idea if it’s her back and she just didn’t react to the meds or if it’s something else. Ahhh. Help my money is slowly drainging away haha
     
  10. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    She's probably going through hormone changes with the spring and her cycles. The vet can check her for ulcers, not sure if just a few weeks would do it on that, the vet could advise you. I'm guessing marish from her seasons and hormones though tbh.
     
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