AVMA - Elimination of Farrier Exemption

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by MzCarol, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. MzCarol

    MzCarol Senior Member

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  2. NaeNae

    NaeNae Senior Member

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    :no:

    Frustrating to me. I just see this as vets trying to monopolize.

    I would way rather have a variety of practitioners in all sorts of fields to be able to choose from and be able to have them consult with my vet, than have a vet tell me what I can and can not do with my horse and who I can or cannot have treat my horse.

    By opening it up, instead of further closing it off, you allow for more education for practitioners and the ability to develop regulatory boards and a code of standards. THAT's what I'd prefer.
     
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  3. Pirate

    Pirate Senior Member

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    Idiotic and could lead to welfare issues with horses.
    Most of the trainers I've worked with can deal with a minor abscess and call in the farrier for the more complicated ones and for corrective work. I've only known a vet used twice for hoof issues and both of those were extreme damage.
    Sounds to me like the vets simply want the money farriers are getting for routine work.
     
  4. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    A similar situation has taken place in the beekeeping world...certain medications that previously were available to beekeepers to combat certain things in their colonies are no longer available except through a licensed vet. Our vet, who specializes in exotics, such as birds, reptiles and popular non-dog/non-cat mammals told me that she now has to do a whole bunch of training she wasn't expecting to have to tackle in order to be sure that local beekeepers can still get the antibiotics and other medications they need. She's really uncomfortable about this personally. But apparently the higher ups in the vet world decided they they wanted their cut of the honey business, too.

    There are a lot of highly trained and highly skilled farriers out there and IMHO, they should be able to continue doing what they do today...and any of the good ones are fully aware of when a vet needs to be called in for more advanced attention.
     
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  5. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    I read the article earlier but I couldn’t understand what the change is. Anyone care to elaborate?
     
  6. DelP

    DelP Senior Member

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    I’ve heard some discussion that this section
    Could mean that farriers can no longer shoe a horse as shoes could be interpreted as apparatus or as therapeutic.

    Would a farrier trimming a club foot be considered treating a deformity? As that would no longer be allowed. Possibly.

    It seems a bit extreme that the AVMA would go that far, but once the exemption is gone it is going to be much harder for farriers to fight and stay in business.
     
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  7. NaeNae

    NaeNae Senior Member

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    A lot of the wording up in BC for issues like this dictate that no one but a vet can make a treatment plan of sorts, which a farrier saying your horse needs to be done in 6-8 weeks is making a treatment plan.
     
  8. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Granted, I am not sure I understood that right (legal english is a little tougher to understand for me) but it would seem that farriers can´t do anything but classic trimming of hooves without a vet´s order/permission. No treatment of abscesses, shoes might be up for debate, certainly those that include pads? And no corrective trimming on a club.
    Sounds to me like farriers are not able to do their jobs without a vet´s permission.
    But again, I might be totally miscomprehending the text...
     
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  9. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Well that’s crappy. Especially considering that the average vet knows squat about feet.
     
  10. Compadre

    Compadre Senior Member

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    What's next? Will grooming your sheepdog to keep it from getting matted be classified as "preventative treatment" ?
     
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