At what point is a colt a cryptorchid

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by RusticR, Sep 19, 2018.

  1. RusticR

    RusticR Full Member

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    So my 2017 colt still hasn’t dropped anything even resembling a testicle...

    He was sedated and checked in March but they were only able to palpate one testicle and not easily. My vet didn’t seem concerned. Felt since he was still so young and was growing fairly fast that he was just growing faster than the cords were.

    He’s a May 31st baby in case you haven’t followed his thread on here. So in March he was 10 months.

    He’s now just shy of 16 months and 14.2 hands. Measured in at 73” for blanket size to give you an idea. He’s BIG and mature for how late of a baby he is.

    STILL no testicles. He lets me poke and prod up there and I also can’t feel anything.
    I will add I’ve no clue what I’m feeling for or if I’m feeling in the right spot.

    At this point I’m starting to give up hope that he will drop at all. He doesn’t have any colt/stallion behavior. He’s pastured with two mares (they are removed when they’re in heat so I don’t know how he’d feel if he had big red backing her hussy back end into his face. Lol) and he doesn’t try anything with them. He doesn’t drop except to pee. He doesn’t do the stallion nose curl.

    Could he still be immature enough that they might drop?

    The kicker.... my vets are 2 and 5 hours away respectively. So I feel like if I’m hauling to ultrasound to see where they are at I might as well schedule a procedure while I’m down there. And I don’t want to act TOO soon in there’s still a chance...

    Since he’s still an angel I have no problem keeping him intact until winter hits. But I’d like to have him taken care of by February if the latest. But if my chances are slim that he’ll drop by then I might as well do it this fall.

    Sorry for the novel! Here’s a picture of the worlds cutest sorrel colt!
     

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  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Put him on a diet, he's a little cubby. He might have some fat deposits blocking their descent. If they don't drop by the end of the year, he is probably going to have to be seen.
     
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  3. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    Wow, that's a big boy!

    Yeah, I'm no expert but I would have expected them to drop by now. We had a crypt when I was a kid - he had one retained and our vet had to dig it out when we got him at 4. Sweet natured guy but always a little studdy.
     
  4. RusticR

    RusticR Full Member

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    Omg Chubby is his LIFE. This was him when I met him at 7 months old. He’s always been an eater. The two mares won’t come up from the pasture to eat but he gladly leaves his buddies for food.

    I did have him on a couple ounces of cocosoya oil that I was adding to his ration balancer that I cut out. Since going out into the big pasture several weeks ago (10 acres of that lush mid cannon height grass) they have all gotten chubby.

    So hopefully cutting out the oil will help him slim down.
     

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  5. RusticR

    RusticR Full Member

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    That was my thought... they should be dropped by now too. Luckily he’s not the least bit studdy. I had him tied next to my red mare when she was in heat in the wash rack and he definitely didn’t care about her... which is lucky Atleast!
     
  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    They normally don't get studdy until they're coming three, if they do at all.
     
  7. RusticR

    RusticR Full Member

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    Well he definitely won’t be keeping them that long! Lol. I’m glad to hear that. My worry with waiting was that he might just “turn” studdy on me and gelding him might not remove all the behaviors.
     
  8. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Nah. All our colts were clueless in the two year old year. You just had some surprises when you brought them back as coming three year olds. Most of them were still acting like geldings, but you always had one or two get all loud and wild eyed, start climbing stall walls and acting way too interested in the girls~!!
    Next step was a call to the owners for the snip/snap, toss 'em on the roof for good luck.
     
  9. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    Nice looking horse! Best color too :D
     
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  10. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    My guy had been bred twice before we got him. Once purposely, once accidentally. Both irresponsibly - he was a beautiful purebred Morgan but he was an unpapered crypt. :rolleyes:

    So I think his studdy behavior came from knowing what it meant to be a stud.

    To be clear, he was a sweet, gentle boy. I rode him in a 4th of July parade when he was still a stallion and only 4 years old. I was 10 and he was a perfect gentleman, even with a mare directly in front of him. But out in the pasture, he had a tendency to "herd" my dad's mare around, and he'd get aggressive when loose with other geldings if he wasn't socialized with them first.
     
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