Arthritis and Jumping.

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Lileon Bierman, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. rhinebeck

    rhinebeck Senior Member

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    This 100% with the exception of what’s approved by a proper team of professionals working with you to better the animal

    My mare has severe arthritic changes in one hock which ended her jumping career but not her flatwork or trail riding - we still do long distance trails as we can when she’s kept in proper shape. But I also followed treatment advice of a vet and other professionals with years more experience then me. I make sure she gets ample warm up and cool outs as well as an array of products including BoT hock wraps to help keep the joint warm. She gets routine care and daily supplements to aid any inflammation and I follow up with a vet as needed to ensure her comfort as a working animal.
     
  2. Lileon Bierman

    Lileon Bierman Full Member

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    My farrier is reliable as well, and thank you! :)
     
  3. Lileon Bierman

    Lileon Bierman Full Member

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    I understand that it is a serious thing. The next thing in line is a vet-check for my lad. Thanks! :)
     
  4. Lileon Bierman

    Lileon Bierman Full Member

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    That's perfectly understandable. I have ceased jumping until an examination by my vet has been done and the go-ahead has been given. It sounds like I may need to start looking into buying another horse too, if I want to continue with jumping. We'll see how it goes and thanks! :)
     
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  5. Lileon Bierman

    Lileon Bierman Full Member

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    I'm sorry to hear that. At least it's not so bad that you can't ride her at all. Thanks also for being so informative about it and the need for treatment. I have ceased further jumping, until an examination has been done by my vet and the go-ahead has been given. :)
     
  6. rhinebeck

    rhinebeck Senior Member

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    When I noticed she wasn’t quite right I started with a lameness eval followed by X-rays which revealed the arthritis

    here these are her X-rays:
    E20B9EA8-EE64-4599-BC2A-B0A080112494.jpeg 83C53E5D-01EF-4584-B849-8E41D96589BC.jpeg

    Between the vet and me it was decided to do an IA injection followed by IM adequan which I followed with chiropractic and massage to ensure the rest of her got back into place. Horses compensate well wouldn’t you know...

    We also followed a rehab program for a while and I added actiflex 4000 powder with some added msm to her feed. This forum was a world of help! Currently she’s mostly a pet due to my health issues and I use turmeric/pepper as her supplement but follow closely with my vet as he gives the go ahead/nope on what we do. So far it’s working wonders and she’s doing great.
     
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  7. Lileon Bierman

    Lileon Bierman Full Member

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    Although the discovery of arthritis can dull your mood a bit, it's really great to hear that she is doing great. Once I have the vet come out, I'll look into supplements, and possible retiring him to just a companion. I may need to look into buying another horse if I plan on continuing with jumping. :)
     
  8. Lileon Bierman

    Lileon Bierman Full Member

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    Here are the photos I took. I also recorded a video for the purpose of showing his movement to you all but it seems I am unable (or it's the website) to upload it. As you are looking at the photos now (front of the horse) the affected leg is the one on the left:
    DSCF4289.JPG
    ^ The hoof on the affected leg (left) grows slightly different to the one on the right.

    DSCF4290.JPG DSCF4291.JPG DSCF4296.JPG

    DSCF4301.JPG
    ^ This is the hoof on the affected leg for a closer look. It is slightly angled.
     
  9. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Hm, those are some wonky front legs.
    How long was it since the last trim? Because those hooves need some tlc...
    I wouldn´t be surprised if the other leg has some arthritic changes as well.
    I am *still* surprised that he isn´t off under saddle. Not even during warm up?
     
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  10. Lileon Bierman

    Lileon Bierman Full Member

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    He was trimmed recently. A couple of (2) weeks ago at the most. We always keep up to date with both our horses' feet. The angle at which the photos were taken could make them look bad, plus, he is barefoot.
    In physical appearance, his left front leg (non-affected knee) looks absolutely fine. It is flat and shows no other bumps or swollen areas like the affected leg. This I studied relatively long and closely. He has no problem lifting and bending the non-affected knee. He does however have problems lifting the arthritic knee in a specific way such as when our farrier takes care of his feet and lifts it higher than I normally would to clean it. This is when my gelding will evidently show he has pain.
    That is true though. He is not off under saddle, not even during a warm-up. He'll flat-out gallop willingly without showing any signs of pain.
     

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