Arena sand

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by CarlisleChipper, Oct 26, 2018.

  1. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    So because the dimensions changed from 147x168 to 145x186 that changes the yards of base I need. I'm thinking the incorrect dimensions were from a moment of dyslexia. So I need 416 yards for a depth of 5 inches. This guy says his dirt is verified 20% sand 60% clay and will compact. He is supplying the dirt from his own 45 acres and is charging me $4 a yard instead of $20 a yard at the local material places. So $5600 for the dirt and loads delivered. For the same dirt at the material yard that would be over $8,000. I'm trying to get the price rounded to $7,000 but will have to wait until I get my tax return. Will shred and chemically treat in the mean time. Can you tell me more about the screenings and density? I was wondering what screened dirt was.
     
  2. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    I have a good enough grade to it that will prevent standing water. I am confused as to what they said though so pardon me. I think they said that from the top of the arena diagonally to the bottom corner there is a 5 foot difference. It's either 5 feet or 5 degrees. I'm completely lost on that. It's a pretty good grade but it doesn't look that steep to the eye or when you walk it.
     
  3. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    These are panoramic pictures of when I first started working on it so all of the cross fencing it there. I plan on cleaning up the trees and they will serve as a refreshing place to take a break during the summer months. I can picture it now, beautiful!
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  4. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    You're too inexperienced and too new to riding to know any better so I forgive you for your petulance. That's a temporary fence around that ring, and the fence can even be moved if that one rectangle goes to slop. If there's only a few riders and it doesn't rain, all it'll do is tear out the grass. If there's a lot of riders or it rains, it will be worse.

    Jumping is not as big a deal, except in front of, and after, the jump, which will deteriorate as the competition goes on. At the very least it gets quite deep.

     
  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Excavators always want to slope your ring. And yes, usually they want to slope your ring on a diagonal. A lot. That works well with the equipment they have, and what they're used to doing for other types of work. That's why they want to.

    Arena builders, not so much.

    But quite frankly, you don't want to be telling an excavator not to do it the way he wants, because that's what his equipment and his experience dictates he does.

    SO GENERALLY(lol) excavators slope the whole arena, the base layer, and the top, usually across the diagonal. You wind up with an arena sandwich. All the layers, a slope.

    Arena builder's don't....usually. If it fits in well, they build your base like a very shallow pitched roof, with a slope downward, falling away from the center line, and put a little more top layer on to minimize the actual slope of the top layer. Say your arena is 66 feet across, so it's 33 feet from the center line of your riding area. That type of construction means less slope - 4 inches or so. And slightly less due to having a slightly less slope on the top layer.

    Then the arena builder will dig gentle swales all around the arena, six or more feet from the edge of the arena, and hopefully those swales can slope together to a run off. So, say, at one corner of the arena, the swales are a foot deep, and at the other, the swales are 18 inches deep, and that water then has a sensible place to go, either a dry well to fill, or a pond, or quick exit to your neighbor's property(just kidding).

    It is said, by excavators, usually, that it takes 1/8 of an inch of drop in one foot, to make water move. In a 120 foot long arena, that's drop across the diagonal he's saying, of about 16 or 18 inches(the diagonal is longer than the long side, remember, if the long side is 120 feet the diagonal is 138 or 140 feet or so). That's more than a foot of drop across that small arena. There are definitely times in dressage that I want that slope. But there are other times I don't. It depends on the horse and the work.

    Also with an 'uneven' surface like sand, it's a little different and 1/8 of an inch in a foot isn't so much as far as getting water to move. It depends on how smoothly you keep your arena raked.

    Now, slightly before Arem starts SCREAMING about dressage princesses not wanting an arena with an 18 inch slope, remember this: the reduced slope of the arena is designed to keep the materials in place longer, and keep the layers from mixing as soon. Remember: it's an outdoor arena, and eventually, all riding arenas eventually fail(outdoor ones faster than indoor ones, generally, but they all eventually fail). The purpose of that initial construction is to hold that off for as long as possible, or it gets expensive. It's not done as it's done to please the dressage princess. Same thing goes for not having a grass arena. It's not because I might break a fingernail if it's muddy. It's because it causes erosion and loss of ground cover, and your local county people don't like that.

    I just got back from Maryland, where the county and state water and soil people are very interested in every little thing the horse folk do, though if I exit my driveway here, and leave a muddy track, the EPA folks will be over here pretty quick too. The bottom line is you have an economic responsibility to yourself to not put in an arena that will fail in 2 years, and you also have those state and county soil and water people too.

    We do, in fact, have some sort of responsibility to our land.


     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018
  6. Joanna Messinger

    Joanna Messinger Registered

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    There's a dust bowl that needs to be "corrected", but those prices are crazy for a sand fill. In these workout video's this arena was thoroughly watered down first and it still became a huge dust cloud. Any suggestions (besides a $29,000 fix)? Breaking The Buck Out Of Calypso
     
  7. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Oh, go stick your head in a sand pit. I am far, far from “too new and I experienced” and many, many of us here know that your “vast experience” isn’t anything but a fantasy. Much like your Wuss horse threads. Fiction.

    Slow day for you that you have to go digging up a reply several days old to counter it with... nothing, really. There isn’t any substance or proof in your post at all. Just flouncing.

    I’ve ridden on grass in rain, after rain, with snow, without snow, in a drought, in a normal summer. No problems whatsoever and I am far, far from an anomaly. As we have well proven.

    Try again. Harder this time. I’m sure you could have made that post at least twice as long. What’s the matter? Google not giving you enough to support your assertion that grass can’t be ridden on? :rolleyes:
     
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