Arena sand

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by CarlisleChipper, Oct 26, 2018.

  1. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    Thanks SLC for suggesting about athletic fields. The barns I've asked locally weren't helpful. Like I said, they're on clay so all that was done was graded probably with a box blade and then footing applied. The 2 places I've asked did not hire people to build an arena from scratch like I have to.
     
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  2. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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  3. Cynical25

    Cynical25 Senior Member

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    $30k is about what I was quoted for my own place east of Dallas, TX, but I've got that "black gumbo" clay. Sadly, I'm not in a position to pay that, so I continue to ride (or more accurately NOT ride, thanks to mud) in my pasture. My friend closer to Austin paid $10k for just a 60' roundpen.
     
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  4. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    The way my outdoor arena was built, the excavator built up a fairly high 'pad' of clay, compacted limestone screening on top of that, and cut swales all the way around the arena. I put rubber chips on it, and it will get some sand on top in the spring. He gave the arena a very slight slope, you probably can't see the slope when you look at the arena.

    That'll have to be it until I have a big chunk of discretionary income. At that time I'd like to put a better base on it, and add some felt to the sand. It's tough in this area as we get very heavy rains and lots of snow.
     
  5. kb1gra

    kb1gra Senior Member

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    I’d try not to go with an “equestrian services” provider if possible.

    My arena was done by “random guy property services” whose name I got from word of mouth. As I said, $14k included an acre of clearing.
     
  6. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    Guy came out and suggested I put down 5 inches of red baseball sand which has clay in it. He reckons it should harden right up and be suitable to ride on. I called the place and they said it'd be $4,700 for 370 yards of it delivered. He would charge $2,500 to spread it even. First I'd have to shred the vegetation that's there and treat it with weed killer. And since it'd go right on top, hopefully that layer of vegetation would prevent the sand from eating up all the new sand. Thoughts on this?
     
  7. JinxedDream

    JinxedDream Senior Member

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    I farm beach sand (mentioned that in other thread). I have an arena in my front yard, installed by the prior owner. I'm told she spent a minimum of $25K to have that thing built and it not impressive by any means. It packed down hard in the summer and is super dusty. It's masonary sand I believe.

    I'm not sure what the concern is with the sand you have naturally? I would just scrape back the topsoil and use the sand underneath. Harrow it frequently. I like the riding surfaces I naturally have in other parts of my property better than the built arena. My horses really had an issue with the surface this summer when we didn't have rain for a few weeks.

    At some point, I'm going to have to completely rework my entire arena. I'm leaning towards just bringing in the sand from a hill at the back, its nicer footing than what was installed. We actually used all the sand from the indoor to back-fill new construction, the indoor was horrid and you couldn't pay me to use it.
     
  8. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    The sand is very soft and deep which means it's not safe to ride on because it can cause soft tissue injuries. I've talked to several more people and this is the new plan. Also, my arena was remeasured and it's 145 by 186. Bigger, yay!

    New plan.
    - shred area
    - treat area with weed killer to kill vegetation
    - grade the top quarter or third of my arena, put that sand in a pile somewhere.
    - put down red baseball sand or red select which is high clay to form a base.
    - compact it.
    - put 2 inches of my own sand that I graded from earlier to put on top of the clay.

    For $5,000. That's my idea now.
     
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  9. JinxedDream

    JinxedDream Senior Member

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    Hope that works out. Make sure you check the drainage of the baseball sand, you don't want it to seal and form puddles.
     
  10. kb1gra

    kb1gra Senior Member

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    You want all vegetation removed. Organics are the problem.

    In order to keep the sand from mixing you really want something like screenings that can be backed to 95-98% density. That is your “base.” If he wants to do this sand, I would ask him how much he intends to compact it.

    370 yards of masonry sand would be $12k and change delivered here. I’m not sure what sand type you’re looking at (“baseball sand” doesn’t mean much to me) but usually the kind you want for footing is more expensive than that.
     

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