Arabian People!!! Advice!

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Sadiewynn, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    22,982
    Likes Received:
    13,854
    The long and low position, the way the lines are rigged between the front legs, is never going to strengthen this horse's back. His back is very weak and hollow and really needs remedial help. I am really sorry. That's all I'm going to say on this one.
     
  2. StraightandTrue

    StraightandTrue Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,056
    Likes Received:
    844
    You two look lovely together. It is very rewarding to have them from an early age as you really can develop a strong bond with them. Also, you know the history which makes it easier to deal with any issues that pop up down the track. The only downside is waiting!

    I also start the double lining in a halter first, then a rubber bit, then a normal snaffle. I do have to agree with slc's comment that rigging the lines between the front legs in this manner can cause a horse to 'curl' it's neck rather than stretch forward and down. It's important to release any pressure on the line as soon as the horse softens, otherwise they can learn to suck back behind the bridle which is an absolute pain to correct. A chambon might be a better option if you know how to use it correctly (or have someone who can show you). Unlike side reins and draw reins, there is a release of pressure when the horse takes it's nose forward. This teaches the horse to confidently seek the bit rather than duck behind it.

    Apologies if you already know all this, just trying to be helpful and save you time down the track. I've spent the better part of 2017 fixing a contact issue that I suspect was caused by the over-enthusiastic use of either side reins or draw reins - I wouldn't wish that experience on anyone.

    Overall, I think you should be very pleased with how your boy is coming along. It's great that you're doing so many interesting things with him, and it's obvious the two of you have developed a bond. All these experiences will shape him into a confident, well-rounded horse you can do anything with. One little tip: if you are planning to train and compete in two different styles, it can be helpful to have a different bit for each discipline. Arabians are incredibly intelligent and this can really help them understand what's expected of them.
     
  3. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Messages:
    5,501
    Likes Received:
    2,497
    The thing about Arabians, and I'm not an Arab person per say. I've trained a bunch of them for various things (including dressage). They are like Gumby. Super pliable and flexible so restraining aids like side reins, draw reins etc teach them bad habits like hollowing the back, ducking behind the bit, counter muscling the neck etc, none of which are good for dressage of any variety and really ruin what you have an Arab for - the flashy fancy movement and presence. So my advise would be to quit with this rig your lunging in and stop being concerned with his head until he's 4 or 5. Build hind end muscle with hills, trail riding. ground poles etc and teach him to carry his body naturally before you start trying to refine his carriage. Really this is true of any breed but especially Arabians and similar ones.
     
  4. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    2,350
    Likes Received:
    3,949
    As a person who has owned, bred and shown Arabians and has Champion Arabian Dressage horses.....I have to say that we use properly fitted side reins, martingales, and draw reins on our horses....properly fitted and used they are excellent tools.... with that said the horse must be taught to come from behind and not work in a false frame.... and in dressage the must be on the bit and not evade behind the vertical.
     
    kodemiester and NBChoice like this.
  5. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Messages:
    5,501
    Likes Received:
    2,497
    I'm sure you do. If they were properly trained, I would not have them though. What I see are Arabs that are NOT trained properly and usually rushed into training aids that are not appropriate. You are on the other side of that coin I do not see until I'm finished with the horse.
     

Share This Page