AQHA HUS class help please

Discussion in 'Equestrian Events, Shows, Competitions' started by Luvahuntseater, Apr 24, 2018.

  1. .Delete.

    .Delete. Senior Member

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    A competent AQHA trainer can do this too. I don't think the OP is too many lessons away from improving dramatically. I don't think there is any need to cross disciplines. I would be worried a dressage trainer would confuse the OP. One discipline at a time,...
     
  2. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    I agree. A few lessons on how to achieve the desired look and feel you need to be competitive at AQHA shows and what that look feels like when you get it would help tremendously! Once you learn how to ask the horse for it and you learn what it feels like when it's correct, it will be easy to go on with your horses training.
     
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  3. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Erm, i was under the impression that HUS is a type of English riding discipline, flat work for a hunter, which is in essence a cross country jumper, which is technically a lot closer to dressage than to western disciplines like reining.
     
  4. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    AQHA HUS is a lot different than your normal hunters. Way less contact, lower head, slower lope, no knee action. It looks nothing like a traditional hunter class imo.



    vs

     
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  5. jojozwiebel

    jojozwiebel Full Member

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    Are there certain exercises to help with this? Asking cause I'm interested too.
     
  6. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    One that really helps April...... Start at the walk until they get the hang of it. While trying to keep their body straight, bump your right rein and ask them to bend their head around to the right for a couple strides. Release, and immediately ask for it to the left. once they have the hang of that, move up to a medium trot. eventually, the body will stay straight, and the head will be swinging like a pendulum back and forth every few strides. this REALLY gets them separate their neck from their body a bit, and really hang it out there nice.

    in terms of improving quality of movement, lateral work. indirect turns (pivots) encourage a horse to lift its shoulders. forehand turns, encourage them to drive up from behind. moving hips and shoulders around at each gait, etc.
     
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  7. jojozwiebel

    jojozwiebel Full Member

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    @Lopinslow

    So it's good my horse already walks like he's a gangster?! Lol
     
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  8. aqhaktberry3

    aqhaktberry3 Senior Member

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    I think you've already gotten a lot of good feedback about the video/performance. I will say, you don't have to have a trainer to succeed. Its definitely more challenging but not impossible. You may not make it to the winners circle at the AQHA congress without a trainer but that doesn't mean you cant succeed in other ways. If you can only afford lessons, do lessons! That alone helps a lot. Also, you could do lessons, and save up for a month or two of training and before the big show send them off for training. There are a lot of options but being a DIY amateur is not impossible :)
     
  9. VermilionStrife

    VermilionStrife Senior Member

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    I know I'm a little late with this, but as a former DIYer myself who had quite a bit of success, you can get by especially at the Rookie/Novice level without a full time trainer. Taking lessons will help you a lot with doing it yourself to make improvements. You want to have a lot of body control. The idea is to maximize the length and reach of the stride without adding speed or excess movement.

    What I see in your video is a very tense walk with a horse who has a curled up neck. The judges want to see a horse who looks relaxed and in the bridle. Your horse looks like he is avoiding the bit at the walk. His neck carriage isn't consistent really at any gait and his strides are inconsistent as well. He has a lot of potential for the Rookie/Nov Am! He's really cute. :)

    My suggestions are to get him to where he isn't hiding his face from the bit. When you bump with your outside rein, you want the neck to drop, not the nose to curl in. It's a difficult habit to break, my horse was doing the same thing for a while. I don't really know how to fix this issue on my own so I sent him to a trainer. Another thing you want is for every stride to be the same. Consistency wins classes! I would also ask for your horse to bring his hip slightly to the inside. It gives a little more step up to the hock.

    You're not that far away from making big improvements!
     

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