Anyone heard of Tums for cribbing?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by saddlebred14, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. saddlebred14

    saddlebred14 Full Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2010
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    11
    So i have this lady telling me that if i feed 1tbsp of crushed tums to my horse it will help him stop cribbing... She is giving it to her horse and that horse is like the queen of cribbing! So far it seems to be helping, but i'm not concerned with my horse because as long as he has food he won't crib. She keeps telling me to do it, so i just agreed. i'm not going to do it, but was just curious if anyone has heard of giving them tums.
     






  2. Sunrisepony

    Sunrisepony Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,311
    Likes Received:
    374
    I've never heard of that personally. Mostly because Cribbing is an addiction to the endorphans released by the action of wind sucking. Which is either developed out of bordem or stress related MOST of the time.

    Have you thought about for your guy though since you said he does fine long as he has hay, maybe one of those Freedom Feeder Small Mesh hay bags?
     
  3. atabal

    atabal Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2009
    Messages:
    1,905
    Likes Received:
    205
    cribbing can be an indication of ulcers. maybe that is why the tums?
     
  4. Simon Says

    Simon Says Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    5,379
    Likes Received:
    232
    if ti works, more power to you. It is a cheap enough experiment I would try it. But in my experience with cribbing nothing worked until I had a cribing surgery done on my horse!
     
  5. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2005
    Messages:
    65,634
    Likes Received:
    29,947
    Yup.

    IF the horse is cribbing due to ulcers, and IF he's not a confirmed cribber already, then it MAY be that the addition of Tums can buffer the acid enough to provide him relief so he doesn't crib.

    Lots of ifs and mays there.

    It's better to alter the diet and/or actively treat the ulcers though.
     
  6. Dawn

    Dawn Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    Messages:
    45,411
    Likes Received:
    2,685
    Is she giving the tums with a meal? If so, and it helps, then I would suspect that the hores either has ulcers or is on the verge of ulcers and the type of feed he's getting is irritating to his stomach. In that case, yes it could help. But as JB said, better to actively treat the ulcers. The tums in a case like this is kind of like a bandaid. Without at least taking away the cause of the ulcers (feed, environment, what have you), you're just continueing to do the damage. If you take away the cause and actively treat, then you might be getting somewhere.
     
  7. saddlebred14

    saddlebred14 Full Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2010
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    11
    My horse has been a cribber forever, and he isn't really a bad cribber. This woman just feels like trying to make me put my horse on everything her horse is on, and i just agree half the time just to get her to leave me alone. I think her horse has major ulcers from way too much **** she is being fed. She gets like 2 scoops of sweet feed a day and a bunch of other stuff. She kept trying to get me to feed my horse cocoa soy oil or whatever that is called, and vegtable oil, and wheat germ oil AND up his grain to get him to gain weight!!! I was like uh, no thanks i'll stick with what my vet said, and he has now gained 50 pounds.

    I have just never heard of someone feeding tums, so i thought i'd ask. She kind of makes things up as she goes sometimes. Her horse is a mess. I hang a net hay bag up and stuff it full of hay every night and it keeps him happy.
     
  8. Ryle

    Ryle Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    Messages:
    6,220
    Likes Received:
    1,976
    Yep, tums can help...short-term...if it's related to ulcers. But they will only reduce the acidity in the stomach for an hour or less so while you are watching after they eat he will look better but after that the acidity increases again.
     
  9. gluey33

    gluey33 Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    2,579
    Likes Received:
    1,468

    Your ideas are more sound than hers;)
     
  10. HorseSense1

    HorseSense1 Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2011
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Why is Sea Salt important to cribbing horses?

    Cribbing has nothing to do with boredom - the horse's flesh body is an organic substance (think back to chemistry class) and requires organic material for complete digestion, and needs proper mineral content to keep the body functioning properly. If your horse stops cribbing while it's eating, it's getting mineral content - just not enough (the plant material pulls nutrients out of the soil, which the body can digest. When the soil becomes depleted of mineral content - and they all do - the plant material will lack a balanced mineral content). Add sea salt, in abundance (free feed), to its diet and the cribbing will cease in time. Be patient, this didn't get here overnight and it will take time to rectify. Read below for a more in depth explanation.

    WHY IS SEA SALT IMPORTANT TO HORSES?
    Sea water is almost identical to the make up of the blood that is running through the horse’s veins. Sea salt replaces the necessary components in the blood that is lost through bacteria and viruses that run through the blood supply. Often times, sea water is used successfully for blood transfusions in people and horses.

    Sea salt helps muscles and organs contract and relax.
    Diarrhea causes a water shortage. Sea salt regulates the water content of the body.
    Cushing’s, Laminitis & Navicular horse’s can bring down their blood sugar levels and reduce their need for pharmaceuticals by taking sea salt.
    Sea salt is a powerful natural antihistamine (Allergies to hay, grains, etc.. can be eliminated)
    Kidneys and Liver will not work correctly without sea salt.
    Sea salt helps the body properly absorb food (hard keepers).
    Swelling in the back legs can be eliminated by consuming sea salt.
    Tying up (muscle cramps) can be eliminated by consuming sea salt.
    Shin splints can be eliminated by consuming sea salt (salt builds bones, not calcium).

    WHY AVOID EQUINE INDUSTRY SALT BLOCKS?
    Salt blocks are purified by removing the trace minerals and heating the salt to 1200°F. Now all that is left is 40% sodium and 60% chloride. Sodium is not salt. Salt is sodium chloride. Trace mineral blocks do not work because they are also heated to form the block.
    **Even if your trace mineral salts are in powder form, the body still cannot absorb them. They are not an organic material and the body cannot utilize them.
    www.CompleteHorseSense.com
     






Share This Page