Anyone have a Corgi?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by endurgirl, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. endurgirl

    endurgirl Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2004
    Messages:
    15,209
    Likes Received:
    13,250
    How well do they get along with cats, children, strangers, other dogs?

    I've been reading up on them and it seems they're relatively healthy breeds. Any input?
     
  2. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2007
    Messages:
    2,924
    Likes Received:
    4,081
    My sil has had several. They can get over weight quite easily (sheis the one that started us feeding green beans as a filler) she is down to one now. They have always been friendly, love attention and were great with our kids.

    They can develop spinal problems because of the long backs, especially if overweight. She has a special ramp to get Charlie into the car, up steps, and on her bed at night. Hers all loved to ride in vehicles. They Tend to bark a lot.

    Biggest draw back is the hair, lol. Get a rumba, and groom often.

    Corgi puppies have to be the worlds cutest!they don’t even look real, look like a Danskin stuffed animal. Get a couple! They were pretty good with our dogs, but ours were Jacks so they were the problem, mostly.
     
    ginster and endurgirl like this.
  3. txgray

    txgray Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    7,777
    Likes Received:
    5,096
    I have one. He's basically a cat. A really cute, really lazy cat. I ended up with him because he didn't tolerate kids so his owners dumped him at the shelter. He also definitely has a strong herding instinct and will nip at the heels of/bark at other dogs when he tries to play with him, which doesn't garner him many friends. He's a very sweet dog otherwise though.

    Corgis can definitely be prone to back issues, hip issues, and teeth issues. It's important to try to keep their weight under control.
     
    ginster and endurgirl like this.
  4. Hackatit

    Hackatit Full Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2016
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    119
    My uncle has had a few, and they've always been very friendly, relaxed dogs (can be active be not as much as other breeds). Fine with other dogs, cats, and children if they hold them properly and great during travel.
     
    endurgirl likes this.
  5. endurgirl

    endurgirl Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2004
    Messages:
    15,209
    Likes Received:
    13,250
    @txgray , do you think the kids tormented him is why he didn't tolerate them? Or maybe he was introduced to them as an adult?
     
  6. Ms_Pigeon

    Ms_Pigeon Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2007
    Messages:
    2,076
    Likes Received:
    3,408
    They were really popular barn dogs where I grew up. In my experience, they were really self-directed and intelligent. While none I knew were ever ill-tempered or aggressive, I'd say about 3/4 of them wouldn't put up with any guff (i.e., rumble-growled at kids who were harassing them, but never offered to bite). The only real problem I saw with them as barn dogs was that their low-rider construction led to the need for much belly fur grooming. :)
     
    endurgirl likes this.
  7. txgray

    txgray Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    7,777
    Likes Received:
    5,096
    Hard to say. He definitely doesn't like anyone getting in his face or messing with him in a way that a kid would. There are just some dogs that are like that though, regardless of breed.
     
    ginster, manesntails and endurgirl like this.
  8. joce

    joce Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Messages:
    2,500
    Likes Received:
    1,824
    Have two currently and have had them in the past. Get one that is tested for DM and you won't have the back issue genetically anyway.

    They can be difficult. We got our first one because the BO couldn't stop her from chasing her animals and train her off leash. I see them for adoption all the time for nipping but herding breed and need a job.

    They shed more than any dog breed I've ever come across and I've had a husky as well.

    Males tend to be more laid back from my experience. Cardigans are also more laid back and I'd love to have one. Always had pembrokes.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
    mooselady, ginster and endurgirl like this.
  9. Shmee

    Shmee Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Messages:
    1,396
    Likes Received:
    1,367
    My labmate has a corgi that is scared of a lot of things, including my cats (who were just acting curious and not aggressive).
     
    endurgirl likes this.
  10. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    9,717
    Likes Received:
    14,270
    Think of them as a herding breed (ASD, BC etc etc) with half the legs. Similar drive, attitude, brains, potential for nipping... They are cute but as with any smart small dog they need to be kept in line. Training is mandatory!

    I have previously thought them to be fairly healthy as far as pure bred dogs go but a friend of mine must have bought a lemon corgi. She came down with some serious issues last year that are still currently affecting her and may affect her for life. This person is a vet tech and is a very diligent dog owner so its not anything she did. That corgi just has something genetically that isn't right.
     
    ginster and endurgirl like this.

Share This Page