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Another "poor nursemare foal" rescue..founded 2014

Discussion in 'Horse Rescue / Adoption' started by meljean, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. meljean

    meljean Senior Member

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    Looks like she was just using their facilities, as you thought.


    Found this on another Swift Creek page.....
    [​IMG]
    Eleventh Hour Foal Haven
    Jessie Clise-Lohr founded Eleventh Hour Foal Haven in March 2014. The foal rescue is operated between her residence and Swift Creek. In 2014, 33 foals were rescued and adopted into good homes, and 87 were rescued in 2015. Eleventh Hour Foal Haven rescues foals from nurse mare farms. Nurse mare foals are often put down as the mares were bred to feed and nurture another, more valuable, mare's foal. We save foals of all breeds, colors, ages and sizes. Unfortunately, this is extremely costly. We are always looking for people to volunteer time, supplies and monetary donations. We hope to be able to grow our program to save more and more foals every year! If you are interested in adopting a foal or getting involved, contact us!
     
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  2. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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    I often wonder if these foals are the output of mares that are being sold to slaughter after foaling, since the plants do not accept mares close to giving birth.

    That would give an extra 'income' to the slaughter shipper from selling the foals.

    And that would more likely be the type of seller who would kill the unwanted foals, since they can't ship either.
     
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  3. Jessie Clise

    Jessie Clise Registered

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    I wanted to set everyone straight. My name is Jessie Clise. I own Swift Creek School of Equitation and founded 11th Hour Foal Haven. in 2014 and 2015 I kept the rescued foals at Swift Creek. Even with donations, it is a HUGE money losing proposition! I used Swift Creek's stalls and pasture and sawdust. The feed and medical supplies etc was all separate and 11th hour did not pay Swift Creek to use the facilities! I get foals from nurse mare farms in Kentucky. in 2016 and for the future they are staying at my house where my husband and I converted a garage and shed into a barn and cleared trees and built fences (with our personal time and money). I spent almost $10k of personal money on saving these foals last year - there is not profit. We dealt with Crypto, Rhodococcus, Salmonella, pneumonia, hernias, infected umbilicus, open wounds, birth defects, etc! Swift creek does NOT produce foals. Since I run both operations (Swift Creek is a riding school and horse boarding facility) I used the Swift Creek page to promote the foal rescue. The foals are nurse mare foals. The mothers were bred so they would be able to be leased out to other people to support more valuable (often race horse) babies fo the mares to be rebred without a foal at their side or due to the mare being aggressive, dead, or unable to produce for their own foal. If anyone has any questions feel free to contact me at 804.921.0146 or email swiftcreekschool@gmail.com I do not post the address of the foals on the internet so that people do not show up unannounced to my home as it disrupts my family. Thank You!
     
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  4. Jessie Clise

    Jessie Clise Registered

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    link to the video about us that was taken at swift creek.
     
  5. Sempiternal

    Sempiternal Senior Member

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    This sounds fishy. I know you probably don't mean it to, but from a financial perspective there are so many issues that could arise.

    The part in bold just doesn't happen. At least not with Thoroughbred mares. The foals are shipped with the mare and are kept back in the stall for the short period of time it takes the mare to be bred. It's much less stressful and less time consuming for both the mare and foal then trying to graft the foal onto a nurse mare. Also, many mares are shipped back to the stud farm for foaling in order for the foal to be eligible for that state's futurities and other benefits associated with being bred and foaling out in a specific state.
     
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  6. Jessie Clise

    Jessie Clise Registered

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    { Nursemare Foals }


    A nurse mare foal is a foal who was born so that its mother might come into milk. The milk that the nurse mare is producing is used to nourish the foal of another mare, a more “expensive” foal. Primarily these are thoroughbred foals, though certainly not limited to the thoroughbred industry. The foals are essentially byproducts of the mare's milk industry. A thoroughbred mare's purpose is to produce more racehorses. A mare can give birth to one foal each year provided she is re-bred immediately after delivering a foal. Because the Jockey Club requires that mares be bred only by live cover, and not artificially inseminated. The mare must travel to the stallion for breeding and may be shipped as soon as 7-10 days after giving birth to a foal, but a period of 3-4 weeks is generally allowed.

    In general there are a number of reasons why a nurse mare may be called upon, among these are: loss of maternal mare, mare has no milk, mare rejects foal, and countless other malady's.

    As far as the Thoroughbred breeding industry goes there are also numerous reasons a nurse mare might be needed, these include: travelling and insurance costs which prohibit the foal from accompaning the Thoroughbred mare to the stallion station, and this is just to name a couple out of many other concerns.

    Traveling is very risky for these newborn racing foals, and insurance costs are prohibitive for the foal to accompany the mother to the stallion farm. At this point a nurse mare is hired to raise the thoroughbred foal. In order to have milk, the nurse mare had to give birth to her own baby. When she is sent to the thoroughbred breeding farm, her own foal is left behind. Historically, these foals were simply killed. Orphaned foals are difficult to rise and no one had tried to raise large numbers of them. Now, these foals do have value ... their hides can be used as “pony skin” in the fashion and textile industries, and the meat is considered a delicacy in some foreign markets.

    That was copied off of another website. There are a TON of Thoroughbreds that have nurse mares used from them.. There are THOUSANDS of nurse mares leased out in Kentucky alone. Not all thoroughbreds use nurse mares but it is a real thing. Other people rent nurse mares as well. It is a big industry but it is not well known about it.. Look up articles on nurse mares.. There are huge nurse mare farms and it is a real thing. Last Chance Corral has articles out about the nurse mares as well. Its a little known industry of the horse world. It's well hidden from many. But really - do some research, learn about it before assuming that a rescue is "fishy" EVERYTHING I do is recorded. My husband se tup a paypal account just for the foals.. but everything is recorded properly. I run this at a HUGE loss because I feel like there is a NEED! I don't make money, its not a tax write off for my other business or anything like that. I am not a tech savvy person and this is a LEGITAMIT rescue.
     
  7. Varisha

    Varisha Senior Member

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    Here is a hint taking text off another 'nurse mare foal rescue' group does not lend credibility to it.

    And we have done the research, just because you don't agree with the conclusion we reach does not mean we have not done the research. There are others on here that have done more in-depth research on this topic than I have and I will let them bring the facts.
     
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  8. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    What makes people suspicious is that there seems to be a much larger pool of foals than there should be.
    Also, any article that I can find only mentions needing a nursemare in the case of the mare rejecting her foal, dying, or not coming into milk. No mention is ever made of breeding a mare and separating the foal from mom for that.

    What percentage of thoroughbred foals require a nursemare? How many TB foals are registered each year?
    How many standardbred?

    Another thing that is curiously absent is exactly WHERE the foals are coming from. As in, names, farm names, towns. Specific details. You would think if there was really a person killing foals s/he couldn't sell you would blast their name across the nation, but that never happens.

    I am not saying you are a liar, but you are saying exactly what a liar would say, and leaving a great deal left out.
     
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  9. Varisha

    Varisha Senior Member

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    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
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  10. Jessie Clise

    Jessie Clise Registered

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    I'm not sure the percentage of thoroughbreds needing nurse mares. I do know that there are nearly 50k thoroughbred foals a year registered by the Jockey Club. I deal with one person near Moorhead, Kentucky. If I blast him, he keeps doing what he does but doesn't allow me to come get the foals. Because of this, I have to be careful about giving out his information. He meets me at a truck stop and we back trailers up against each other and he runs them on and then I carry whatever ones cannot walk into the trailer. He has 180 mares that he breeds each year. His brother has a farm too of around 100 mares. I know of 4 other farms that each have over 100 mares (one has close to 300) and of several smaller farms. A lot of the foals are induced labor foals or are premature and do not make it. These farms are in Paris, KY, and other towns near Lexington.

    So we really run into an issue of how do we stop the industry? Someone needs to step up and try to stop it, but it really cannot be the people rescuing the foals. This is because If I try and stop it and the people I get foals from find out, they just dispose of the foals in other ways - leaving to starve to death, shooting, dumping at auctions, etc. I am providing a solution for as many of these foals as I can until someone can figure out how to stop or change the industry!

    A problem I have run into is that people are adopting foals from me, then claiming that they were "rescued from11th hour" and then I see people trying to raise funds for them. I have a legit 501c3 that I operate under and am trying to find a way to not adopt out to people who are trying to get others to fund their rescues.. Once they are with us, they are rescued and do not need another
     

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