And another rescue in trouble.....

Discussion in 'Horse Rescue / Adoption' started by coloredcowhorse, Nov 24, 2016.

  1. coloredcowhorse

    coloredcowhorse Senior Member

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    Nearly 50 Horses Seized From Hill County Ranch

    This is being repeated across the country on an almost weekly basis. THIS is why rescues need to meet certain qualifications BEFORE opening their doors and need to be licensed and monitored by either state or county officials....all rescues, not just those for horses. We say that animals are members of our families. We require official oversight of places like foster homes for children. Why do we give just anyone who professes to love animals a free ride (and tax exempt status if they get a 501c3) when they hang up a FB page and a fund raising page and declare themselves a "rescue"?
     
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  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Idk myself - the overhead for 50 horses is huge. Shoot, another one. :(
     
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  3. coloredcowhorse

    coloredcowhorse Senior Member

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    Shouldn't they have to show they have the financial resources and abilities to provide care BEFORE they are handed horses by the courts or put up page after page of fundraising pleas?
     
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  4. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Why do they still call those "rescues"?

    It's plain old animal hoarding.
     
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  5. coloredcowhorse

    coloredcowhorse Senior Member

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    Because "rescue" means they can beg donations from those who see every animal as save worthy and can't do it themselves so pitch money instead. It also means they get to look like saints to many. And it has some seriously great tax benefits if they go to the trouble of getting a 501c3. Even if they screw up badly it is not all that likely that they will be prosecuted for behavior that would get a private owner in the slammer in a heart beat.
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I did some research on rescues by looking at the horses they are wanting to purchase and/or are selling.
    I found that a lot of horses were ride-able or were suitable as pasture puffs and were being marketed appropriately.

    However there were a fair number of horses that were suffering from severe lameness or other disorders that needed desperately to be euthanized, that SOME rescues were marketing to be sold as riding horses.
    I saw several different disorders that merited euthanasia. One horse suffered from severe DSLD and was marketed for 'light riding'. There were several other horses that were obviously being marketed very, very inappropriately.

    However, this was limited to specific rescues. This sort of flawed marketing was not being done by all the rescues I looked at.

    My sample was pretty small and obviously some horses won't be so easily identified as wrongly marketed. But as a result, I would say that not all rescues are guilty of this.

    I think it would be a good idea if some did not paint ALL rescues with such a broad brush.

    I'm not yet used to the idea.

    When I was young, pretty every horse trainer, instructor and pinhooker ran a 'rescue'. There was a constant cycle of horses to low-grade auctions and back out again, to riding schools, livery stables and customers. It wasn't at all unusual for a trainer/instructor to stop off at one of the many auctions and find a couple cheap horses to take home. They paid for the horses out of their business income.

    I saw the most unbelievable young horse yesterday. He was a Paint-Gyspy cross, believe it or not. He would have gone toe to toe with any well bred warmblood pony. He was beautifully marked and elegant. And he had just been broke and was carrying around a tiny little girl. My jaw was on the floor, LOL.

    Some of the Amish go to the low-grade auctions and look for cheap project horses to train and resell. They don't solicit donations :)

    If soliciting donations really makes an organization able to go to an auction and pick up six or twelve horses and turn them around, I'm happy.

    If they are marketing lame horses that really should be euthanized, I am not happy.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2016
  7. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    I've got no problem with that either - what seems to be happening are folks taking on rescue operations with fairly nefarious intent I guess. Using them as their income on donations and not putting things towards the horses care. Lots of starving, lame or injured horses unfortunately. That's horse pucky of course - you'd really not call what you meant rescue operations as you have to file forms for taxes related to it.
     
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  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I'm punting but I'd guess that most of the 'organizations' claiming to be 501c3 organizations are no longer, or never were, 501c3 organizations.

    Have you ever contacted someone online and asked them if they really have a copyright or trademark on some catchily-named training method, LOL? A pal of mine was a lawyer and did that for fun.

    I'm sure the 501c3 claims are pretty close to that - total malarkey.
     
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  9. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    You've got a point. They're required to have them though or at least filed the basic. I don't think they're required to produce it for you just on request though on a lark. Idk that for certain though-!!
     
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  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    To be honest, I could care less if someone is a 501c3 or not, if they do a decent job of getting last chance horses into a better place.

    If they pick up horses in trouble and turn them around so they wind up in better homes, I don't really care what their tax status is. I don't even care if they make a profit. As long as the horses wind up in a better place - an appropriate place.

    What I don't like is people who lie to squeeze money out of people.

    But the flip side is that at a point, people just have GOT to start developing and exercising critical reading skills. This is an epidemic. People just read and believe what they want to believe, and don't even question anything. This applies to every aspect of life today, not just horses. We are living in a bona fide idiocracy.

    Last year, around 20,000 Thoroughbreds were registered with the jockey club. The idea that there are 20,000 nurse mares around, originated with the factoid that there are 20,000 Thoroughbreds REGISTERED a year, not the discovery of 20,000 nurse mares or 20,000 displaced foals. Places in the US that claim to have such foals handle a HANDFUL of foals, not 20,000.

    And the idea that the foals are simply killed and there is this huge 'hidden industry' is just nonsense. It's a lie. Even to a completely crass person, even crossbred weanling foals are worth money and simply killing them is a waste of money.

    I tried like mad to find a nurse mare last year. And I talked to a LOT of people about it. I was told over and over and over, by people who ran broodmare operations in the five top Thoroughbred registering states, that the best mother a foal can have is his own and that they do NOT routinely use nursemares. The foal's mother is also the cheapest. They simply cannot afford to hire a nurse mare if the mare is healthy, able to lactate and able to walk around.

    Leasing a nurse mare costs in the thousands of dollars. Seven thousand, nine thousand, those were prices I was quoted. No one can afford to pay that just for the halibut.

    Further, the idea involves much ignorance and willful stupidity. If I REALLY had a race or sport mare I didn't want to take out of competition, I'd do an EMBRYO TRANSFER, not let her birth the foal and then try to graft it onto another mare!

    Why is it that the people who believe this stuff don't even consider that? Probably because they don't know anything about the different options a sport or race mare owner has.

    If it's such a high priority to continue to compete the mare, for pete's sake, why would someone have her birth that foal when they can do embryo transfer?

    MOST of the cost of embryo transfer is leasing the mare, so it's not like one is paying a whole lot more to do embryo transfer compared to foaling the mare out and then putting the foal on another mare and not racing the mare for at least 6 months, and all the risk and cost of that.

    Birthing the foal would mean she'd have to not race after her sixth or seventh month(yes, actually, mares can race or compete intensely up to the sixth month with no problem) - I'd be giving up FOUR months of competition plus a lengthy period of time to get her back in shape, after 4 months with little to no workouts AND the birth creating a big problem with slack pelvic ligaments, too, if I let her birth her foal and then grafted it onto another mare.

    For another thing, having a foal is really a risk many people do not want to put an expensive performance or race mare through. It's dangerous. It's risky. There could be some very bad complications. Most people are not going to CHOOSE to put that mare through a pregnancy when they can do embryo transfer.

    And there is an inherent risk in taking a horse out of training, getting her unfit, and then fitting her back up. Horses tend to get injured during that time frame. It's particularly risky. If I was so bent on not giving my mare a break, I'd do embryo transfer, not have her birth a mare and then graft it onto another.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2016
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