Amish morgan horses

Discussion in 'Horse Rescue / Adoption' started by claireandchase, Jan 27, 2017.

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Do you think amish morgans are abused

  1. yes

    5.3%
  2. no

    94.7%
  1. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    My only issue here ^ is that most of the auction houses have closed. You can't pick and choose what action, if any, you have. We now have C.L. as the only resort to sell a less than well trained, and in some cases, well trained but older or 'too much for the owner' horse.

    The last thing anyone with any sense wants is a Rescue buyer to get their horse. Who knows how much they know? They are, 99% of the time, not as experienced as they should be to even own a dead broke horse, let alone a horse with any kind of issue, be it in training or health.
     
  2. rhinebeck

    rhinebeck Senior Member

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    Moore is well known for this - I bet many others are too but Moore is one I know of well. His "equines for rescue" site are ones that were never going to load from what my research found whereas I'm pretty sure he already had full trucks prior to listing horses on his "for rescue" site
     
  3. rhinebeck

    rhinebeck Senior Member

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    There's Facebook too...
     
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  4. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    Poor shoeing, if that was even the case, because he was poorly shod. Not because he was a cart horse. I have cart mules and they are very carefully shod to limit slipping on asphalt.

    Did you not make some assumptions based on this one horse you seem to have knowledge of? Narrow minded judging of the Amish as a group because you think an Amish person or persons may have abused your horse?

    Pot, meet kettle.

    I am sick of abuse and neglect of equines being blamed on breeders.

    Abuse and neglect are the responsibility of the person that abuses and/or neglects. It is not the fault of a breeder if someone buys an equine and abuses it. Breeders are not responsible for the animal for all of it's life any more than I am responsible for my kids for all of their lives.

    Over breeding is not what cause the glut of equines on the market. The economy tanking in close proximity to the closure of equine slaughter facilities in the US is responsible.
     
  5. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Right and.. Wrong. Over breeding of low class or questionable stock accounts for about a third if not more of the horses. They're not bred for purpose or with intelligence so they wind up at auction at best. Yeah, the economy and closings coincide with it, but this where they began.. With a backyard breeder gambling on a miracle foal.

    Miracles don't even happen often with a well thought out breeding plan and proven horses. That's where I'm coming from. People are doing the most ridiculous mutt crosses and breeding grade horses. It's slowing down, but it needs to stop. I blame a lot on them and you can't blame everything on the economy, super horses are still claiming high prices and sought after, not winding up a podunkt joes auction with a kid riding them. Papered horses of medium quality should never be bred as it's likely going to wind up at...you know..
     
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  6. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    Nope,Carefully read what I answered,previously.I didn't judge the Amish....second it's my own horse that I adopted thru a Morgan Horse only rescue group.Just because You shod your mules correctly does not mean everyone else does.This rescue ends up with most of the rescues being pinfired ,poorly shod,lame ,skinny Morgans that worked hard and now can't do their hard job anymore and end up at New Holland.99% of theses rescued were formerly Amish owned.
    I'm the last person to judge a specific group ,as I wrote earlier in the threat.There is abuse in every part of the horse world, doesn't matter what group anyone belongs to.
    As for breeding....the real horse breeders are not at fault.Just read the "Breeding" forum on this site.That is what's disturbing and frustrating to me.
     
  7. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Pinfiring isn't USED any longer. Freeze firing is used. It's done to HEAL an injury that would otherwise totally cripple a horse.

    See, you don't understand what it's about. You ASSUME that since there are marks on the horse's legs, it was abusive. No, it was done to SAVE the horse from death or a life of being a cripple. The Amish don't pinfire horses, Vets pinfire or, now freeze fire, horses.

    You say 99% were formerly Amish. This doesn't correspond with 99% OF the Amish. If a horse that I or anyone else owns, Amish included, is injured and needs freeze fired, It's humane to get it done. This is a technique that floods the injured area with blood. The WHITE BLOOD CELLS are what DOES the healing. They remove the damaged tissue and the more you have in there working to repair the injury, the faster and BETTER the horse will heal. Find out about stuff before you just listen to the words of others and adopt their opinion of pinfiring being 'bad'.

    Would you rather they just put a bulllet in the horse?

    Yes, totally agree. It's the people backyard breeding, breeding their mare, who is outta nuthin' and by nobody, cuz they wants a baby hossie. They're the ones who are the irresponsible ones. Go buy a decent horse from a good breeder if you want a horse. Your mare doesn't NEED to carry you a foal so you "have something from her''.
     
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  8. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    Not sure where I indicated pinfiring is bad.All it shows that there are horses with lameness issues,being treated.They could go on fine for years to come or be dead lame after a month,depending on the severity.These horses most likely have a lesser chance to find a good working homes due to previous injuries.Damaged goods.....Theses are the ones going from auction to Auction,stressing,worrying,getting sick,being injured in the pens.
    Put a bullet in their head? If it will prevent that the horse will continue to suffer or living a life without dignity,YES,put a bullet in its head.Then we wouldn't have to have arguments about auctions,what constitutes a rescue etc.
    Now,I'm sure I will get crap for this one,too.
     
  9. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Yes, you get more crap because you're talking "rescue speak"

    You did indicate pinfiring as a 'bad thing". If you worked with these horses and saw how they came out after they were pin fired, saw them go from put a bullet in them, to sound, you wouldn't be talking like the rescue speak.

    We don't CHOOSE to kill a perfectly healthy horse because he has a leg injury just because YOU and others don't 'like the look' of his legs now. Whoop dee do~!! The horse has some hair spots on his legs all lined up in a row: 'damaged goods' you say~!! Yet you think you're all for the horses at the rescue. I think not. You need to change your mind set.

    The horses I've had direct contact with who got pinfired, returned to WORK. For you to call them 'damaged goods' is just so distateful to me, I could vomit. So if it isn't all pretty and nice and sound every second of it's life, just put a bullet in it.

    Good to know your opinon.
     
  10. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    You guys missed my point, I think. Unless the breeder is the one abusing or neglecting, they are not responsible for such abuse or neglect. The person doing the abusing or neglecting is solely responsible for it. No one else. Ever.

    If we are going to blame breeders, they are responsible for all of it every time it happens. Good breeders, indifferent breeders and bad breeders. Sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander.

    Put the blame where it lies, with the abuser/neglector.
     
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