Amish Horses Standing Tied

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by doublebarr, Dec 23, 2010.

  1. doublebarr

    doublebarr Senior Member+

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    Just thought I would share some pictures I took today that might make for an interesting training discussion. This is one of the local Amish school houses about a mile away from us. They were having a meeting today (Thursday and Sunday are their "off" days for their ordnung) and there were about 50 buggys parked at the school. Now, most of the horses were still hitched and they were tied in a nice row down two fences. Some of the horses were tied with halters under their driving bridles, and most of the others were tied by snapping a lead onto the bit and tying off. ONLY 3 had neck ropes. (Gee RD, maybe I should have told them they were doing it wrong because you said ALL amish tie with a neck rope:rolleyez:)

    Now all these horses are at different levels of training as the younger men drive the "flashy" fresh horses and older family men drive the steady horses so the wife can hitch up if she needs too and be safe driving. However, each and every one of these horses stands tied calmly and willingly for HOURS right along side other horses that they aren't familiar with. They also stand quietly while traffic passes by right in front of their nose along the road. They also all appeared very well fed and well cared for (most of our Amish in this area are very good with their animals and we don't have the problems that some communities do.) And many of these families raise blood stock from very nice lines and show, so it's not just "junk" horses tied up together.

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    See how close to the road they are:
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    Now, you know not every horse they get is a "natural easy tying horse" and I know about 15 of the horses there have less than 60 days on them under buggy, so how can they all be such well behaved horses when asked to stand tied for hours on end, often using the bit to hook to?

    IMO, it's because they take the time and the care to teach the horse to stand tied solid and not let them get away with "tantrums". I can show you many "high hitching trees" in the yards of each Amish house. Each horse spends time tied to the line so they learn patience and that throwing a fit really gets you no where. With VERY FEW exceptions, any horse can be trained to stand tied hard and fast (not trained fast, but fast meaning set). And even the horse that has learned how to break something to get free, they tie him to the high hitch with a good solid double leather halter or rope halter and they quickly learn how to tie solid.

    Personally, I think a lot of people don't realize that it can be done. They've run into a "horse person" who has said "it's not safe" or "it's not necessary" and they fall into that idea fully. However, I don't consider a horse truely broke if it cannot solid tie with confidence.

    Now how you get there is a many and varied road with many good options for reaching that final goal. Be it a "tie blocker ring" or simply standing there with the line wrapped where you can manually do the release or what have you, but IMO the goal should be a horse that has the confidence to tie solid and respect that tie.
     






  2. draftlover

    draftlover Senior Member+

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    I have learned a lot about horses through our local Amish. Most around here, that I know, are great with their horses too.

    I think part of what is different about their training versus ours is that they NEED to have their horses trained to get around.

    We use horses more as a luxury.

    What I mean is, I think attitude of the trainer/handler has a lot to do with what, and how, a horse learns.
     
  3. TheBombDotCom

    TheBombDotCom Senior Member+

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    Whay are all thr amish horses either black or brown? Anyone else ever noticed that?
     
  4. rwinksters

    rwinksters Senior Member+

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    The more I hear about the Amish, the more I'd like to go live with them. It all just makes sense to me.
     
  5. doublebarr

    doublebarr Senior Member+

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    You wouldn't like it if you were a confident, independent woman :no:
     
  6. draftlover

    draftlover Senior Member+

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    She's right. Women never get a day off either. Only the men do. Someone still has to cook the meals and guess who that is.

    I'd never be able to give up central heating or cooling. Ü
     
  7. doublebarr

    doublebarr Senior Member+

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    The Amish are "plain" people. Chestnut, bay, black and brown are good colors. They will train "loud" outside horses, but to specifically breed for them is drawing attention to the individual, not the group, which is discouraged. No one man should stand above another, in their opinion.

    Also, most of their horses are driving types. Standerdbreds, Saddlebreds, Morgans and then of course drafts and draft crosses to the lighter horses mentioned before. They just don't breed for color on purpose.
     
  8. doublebarr

    doublebarr Senior Member+

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    VERY true statement!!!!
     
  9. MyBelgianAzzy

    MyBelgianAzzy Senior Member+

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    Really neat post, and very cool pictures.
     
  10. MysticsAbi

    MysticsAbi Senior Member+

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    That would most defiantly rule out the horse in your avatar then! :p :D
     






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