About Mares?

Discussion in 'Horse Rescue / Adoption' started by A. Rose, May 11, 2018.

  1. rhinebeck

    rhinebeck Senior Member

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    90% of goat feeds are made in the same facilities as those of cattle.

    The thing is goat feeds alone are rarely medicated - and most people who have them as companions get wethers (altered males) who don’t need grain at all. Graining a wether can cause further problems in itself including obesity, mineral stones (esp urine), and hoof/growth issues. Goats are very hardy they can live without grain in most cases, the exceptions are meat breeds whom need the calories to grow fast and dairy breeds who are being actively milked. Does whom are being bred/kidding rarely need grain as quality hay is best, if condition is lost then add a hard feed.
     
  2. cschattner

    cschattner Senior Member

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    I see
    I dont know much about goats except that the little ****s are escape artists and will dent your car when given the slightest chance to use it as a climbing obstacle. I might get one someday once I get my hobby farm but thats a maybe.
     
  3. rhinebeck

    rhinebeck Senior Member

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    I have one in with my mini now - who’s New found thing is jumping the fence
     
  4. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Rose, if you are that inexperienced and new to horses the goat question is obsolete anyway, you should keep your horse at a boarding barn where a knowledgeable professional has an eye on things, you get lessons and learn something about keeping horses.

    Otherwise your horse just ends up like the tons of sad cases with neglected feet and ill fitting saddles hat are kept in unsafe fencing and are are "ridden" by their beginner owner by kicking them to speed up and pulling the reins to slow down, while not getting vet care when they have a health problem because the ignorant owner doesn't even realizie that there is a problem.
     
  5. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    I had goats and horses at the same time, but never put them together. I tried to turn them out together for the afternoons, that was the plan, then pull the horses out at feed time so there would be no feed issue.

    Nope, didn't work because my QH flat out HATED them, struck my Billy goat with both fronts, raked him down his back, caught himself, and did it again the next stride.

    My Haflinger wasn't as bad. He'd just chase them and reach down, nipping at their butt cheek. Good way to end up running the meat off your goats and possibly getting some killed: turn your horses out with goats. Not to mention, a ticked off goat can ram your horse's leg and break it. Then you have a dead horse.

    Better to just rotate your goats and horses. Goats in one pasture for a week, then corral them outside of that pasture, turn the horses out there for a week, and the goats in the pasture the horses were in.

    That said, you need to have shelter big enough for the horses in both pastures.
     

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