About Mares?

Discussion in 'Horse Rescue / Adoption' started by A. Rose, May 11, 2018.

  1. A. Rose

    A. Rose Registered

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    Thank you! I was looking into geldings and they seem perfect for me. I even found one that is around 10 years old, so its great :)
     
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  2. A. Rose

    A. Rose Registered

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    Thank you for the advice. I live in the country and I have a 5 acre pasture in the front of my house. We also have around 175 acres of farming land and about 8 acres in the top pasture, so I dont think I will need to board. I was just thinking of putting my horses in the 5 acres that might have goats in it, but I'm still looking into that.
     
  3. A. Rose

    A. Rose Registered

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    Yes, I have looked at the costs. They are very expensive, but I have an alternative. I was planning on breeding boer goats for a goat herd and selling the babies to 4H kiddos who need goats. I have bought my goat very late and I have to tell you that it was maddness.

    Every single person we went to were sold out of babies, but we found one person who posted a few babies on Craigslist. He told us that he had 5 other people behind us that wanted the goats and he posed the ad a day prior to when we got them. I do believe that I will be able to pay off some of the monthly expensive, but I am still looking at other alternatives :)
     
  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    You're pretty young A. rose, even if you were older by a bit you need to have your folks behind you on this. I hope they are and support your interest, most do... best of luck to you in getting and maintaining your horse. Take time though, patience is important.
     
  5. cschattner

    cschattner Senior Member

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    A lot of cities have zoning laws and may not allow horses on land under a certain amount of acres. Each animal has to have X amount of land plus so much for each animal after that. I know in the area I live the first horse needs 5 acres and each additional horse needs 1 additional acre.
    You may be allowed to have the horse on your land but now you have the other issue of a horse being a herd animal. Very few horses can live a happy life as a singleton. A vast majority need a companion and a goat won't cut it. I know a couple horses that will take out a fence to get to another horse since they can not tolerate living alone. It was a disaster and an emergency vet call. One horse almost impaled himself on a T-post, another went through the perimeter fence which let the other horses loose. The horse that was buddy sour got wrapped in the dividing fence and it had to be cut off while another person unplugged the fence and another chased the loose horses back into the remains of the pasture. That horse ended up in a stall in the barn where she screamed constantly and paced. She was separated so she could heal from hoof problems, which took the better part of a year.
    That was just the horse being separated by hot wire, imagine being completely cut off from all other life besides the goats.

    Also comes the other problem of knowing about the horses nutrition. Do you know what causes colic and how to treat it, how about laminitis? Both are common and can be life threatening. Each requires the facilities to handle it such as dry lots and a shelter to treat by a vet. Do you have either of these or the means to get them. Barns can cost upwards of $50,000 to build. If you have the barn then you need the money, know how and equipment to build stalls and/or shelters. All cities except for a very few require livestock to have full access to a shelter to get out of inclement weather. That can be a lean too or free access to the barn.

    Most horse owner board the horse for years before bringing them home even if they have the facilities and land to accommodate them. Horses are smart but seem to have a penchant for getting themselves into danger and eventually injury.

    My gelding the second year I owned him suffered from a serious choke. He got greedy and ate his grain and everyone else without chewing it and it lodged in his throat from his chest to his throat latch, it was grain so it soaked up his saliva and expanded into a solid mass of wet grain. He managed this overnight and sat all night with a compacted throat barely able to breath. The morning feeder noticed and called me which was a Sunday (emergency vet call $150) vet came out and had to sedate and tube him. They shoved a tube up his nose and into his throat then used water to flush the grain out of his throat and out his nose. It took an hour to get it all out. Thats how much grain my idiot consumed before he finally stopped eating.
    In the end the vet charged $500 to save stupids life. After that I had to stall him, soak his hay and no grain for 2 weeks so his throat could heal.
    3 years ago my moron again kicked a cattle fence which wrapped his leg and came close to gloving his leg. He cut it down too the muscle. I did not have a vet as I was new to the area and BROKE so I treated it myself. I used Iodine, Vetracin, salve, vet wrap and nonstick wound pads. I got lucky and all he has 3 years later is a scar. It almost got infected even with daily treatment but I recognized the signs of infection and was able to stop it.
    All of this takes years of research, asking questions and the ability to think outside the box. First time horse owners often fall all over themselves even with all the books in the world. Having that trainer right there with you too tell you your an idiot is indispensable. Seriously my Barn Owner had to tell me I am stupid many times. Even people here have done it but not as nicely and it generally lead to some arguments. In the end I realized they where right.

    My horse has sweet itch which basically is a nasty bug allergy which is not common in my area and my vet was just pulling skin scrapings and shrugging her shoulders. I came here and asked everyone and got an answer from a member all the way in Europe. Well it's incurable and can only be managed with fans, stalls, dex, sheets and a whole lot of bug spray. Knowledge is power, get it and use it.
     
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  6. cschattner

    cschattner Senior Member

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    Before I forget goat feed is lethal for horses so no goats in the horse pasture.
     
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  7. rhinebeck

    rhinebeck Senior Member

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    Only medicated feeds are lethal to horses - the risk in non medicated is still high. Goats do surprisingly well stealing horse feed and not all goats need grain - wethers especially.

    But everything else you have said even above is so true it’s why I ended up buying a mini for Nemo’s companion which I don’t recommend unless you know the horse well and that it won’t use the mini as a football

    But take home is people don’t realize how much more expensive it is to keep horses at home. There’s a reason board costs what it does
     
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  8. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    You shouldn't go buying a horse, that should be done by an experienced person with a lot of horse related knowledge who tries them under saddle for you and picks suitable candidates for you to choose from because you have no idea how to figure out if a horse is suitable for you or not.
    Also: Don't buy without a pre purchase vet check because buying a horse that has health issues can quickly cost you thousands of dollars and possibly you end up with a horse that permanently can not be ridden.

    By the way, how is your budget once you own that horse? Boarding, vet, farrier, continued lessons, some savings for medical emergencies, trainer in case behaviour or under saddle problems come up that you can't solve?
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2018
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  9. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Goats are not suitable company for horses. Firstly, totally different species, different body language etc. About 50 million years of evolution seperates the even toed and odd toed herbivores. They have really NOTHING in common besides eating grass. With goats, cattle etc a single horse is still as lonely as in a pasture alone. Do you want to share your flat with a gorilla instead of another human? Would that make for good or interesting conversations and would you like to share their food?

    Plus, goats need different fencing and some horses flat out HATE goats. I would be very very careful if you plan to graze horses with other species, particularly if there is not really a lot of space where they can avoid each other and everyone can do their own thing.
     
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  10. cschattner

    cschattner Senior Member

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    The info I was able to find basically just said any goat feed will kill a horse. Either way it is best to not let a horse eat any goat feed as the risk is just not worth it.
     

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