About Mares?

Discussion in 'Horse Rescue / Adoption' started by A. Rose, May 11, 2018.

  1. A. Rose

    A. Rose Registered

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    As I am a beginner who has only rode a horse a few times (please note that I will ve riding more horses soon!), I am going to be getting a horse sometime next year! Anyways, I have found a horse that is a 7 year old mare that is 14.3 hands. If I could take some tips on mares and maybe even some facts about them, that would be great! Thank you :)
     

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  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Sock away tons of lessons and soak up as much as you can from here, your barn and reading as well as checking out horsemanship on line. A good source is Warwick Schiller on Utube as he's free, fabulous and easy to understand.

    There's nothing about mares I can think of you need to know in relation to riding. They're actually my choice if I've my selection in my personal horse. Sometimes their season can be difficult, but majorly problematic is rare in my opinion. She's a great looking mare, post conformation shots when you can - there's a post at the top of the board "critique" that tells the best way. It'd be smart to have a fresh set of eyes look at her for any problems you might not see.
     
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  3. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Lol, mares come in all varieties, from Tomboys to Divas, just like girls do. Never judge a horse by it’s sex, color or breed, because they haven’t read the books, they don’t know the stereotype they should be aspiring to!
     
  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    First, don't buy a 7year old. Your first horse, after a year of at least once a week lessons, needs to be well broke and a teenaged horse. The less experience with horses that the person has, the MORE experience with PEOPLE the horse needs.

    You would be better off with a teenaged gelding. You can learn all about marishness and being surprised when your mare has a bad heat cycle, and gets fussy to ride, later on in your riding career.

    Right now, you only have enough experience to judge a horse by how attractive it looks to you. VERY typical newbie mistake: by the one you think is pretty. Let someone experienced in buying horses for beginners pick a few out for you to try.
     
  5. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    If this horse is well trained, with a good mind set, and quiet as a 7 YO, I wouldn't let the young age deter me from looking at her. I'm not a mare fan and wouldn't buy one unless I was looking for a broodmare.....but that's just my personal preference and experience after owning a few. When horse shopping, because you are a beginner first time horse owner, have an experienced horse person go with you and help you in your search. Finding that person might be hard, because I know horse people that have decades of experience but I wouldn't ask their opinion if I was horse shopping. It's the QUALITY of the horse experience that matters.
     
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  6. rhinebeck

    rhinebeck Senior Member

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    Mares aren’t for everyone, they have very wide personalities - as said above.

    Geldings are generally duller and more willing to agree

    “Ask a mare, tell a gelding” - always a good way to look at it.

    She’s cute but unless she had a spectacular mind on her I’d probably pass her up. I’d bring your trainer to look for horses.
     
  7. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    There is a vast difference between riding horses and caring for them. Lots of barns will let you work in exchange for lessons. Or you can sometimes get lessons from people who also teach horse care. Pony club or a horse-centered 4-H group are great resources too.

    Riding is the smallest percentage of what you do when owning a horse. Grooming, feeding, first aid, cleaning, repairs - those take the bulk of the time and are far more critical.

    Horses destroy things, they hurt themselves, they have surprisingly delicate digestive systems, and they make a mess.

    Learn to ride but more important, learn how to take care of a horse - not from a friend or a book (though books are very helpful) but from someone who is a horseman/woman.

    It will also put you in contact with lots of different horses which will help you learn to understand them.
     
  8. cschattner

    cschattner Senior Member

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    OK I was the exception to the rule and ended up with a 5yo green as grass gelding as my official first horse. I owned a 20ish yo mare before him but our ride time together was short lived and I spent more time on doctoring her then anything which in itself is not a bad thing. You learn the difference between a snake oil and actual product that is going to help.
    Sadly I had to put her down after going through hell to try and bring her back to her former glory. She was a beautiful old mare with a quirky attitude and she taught me a lot.
    My gelding has put me through the ringer as well but he is honest and if he don't like the plan he will still try but he will make sure you know he thinks it's BS.
    Don't jump into horse ownership even a year is too little of time. Once you get that horse your bills double and lessons will fall by the wayside. You will have board, farrier care which the prices vary drastically between barefoot and shod 2/4, vet bills mostly vaccines every year but when something goes wrong it GOES WRONG, tack, basic care items like brushes and refills on boo boo ointment, trust me you need it. Fly spray which always feels lighter even if you didn't use it. Blankets, oh my god the blankets. You got the fly sheet, show sheet, mid and heavy weight winter/fall/spring blankets and heaven forbid your horse is a baby when the bugs come out cause now you will need fly boots.
    Do you know the boarding options in your area. Most places you can get pasture board but that is starting to become more scarce with the cost of land going up. A lot of places are going stall only boarding which is crazy expensive. I live in farm country and its even happening here. Are you prepared to make that monthly commitment. Horses are hard to offload especially when the economy tanks, gets older or becomes a pasture puff at a younger age. This is a 20 +/- commitment.
    I have had Donny for about 10 years and even I am thinking about not getting back into horses once he passes. Its a financial bourdon and life is crazy unpredictable. I almost became permanently disabled 8 months ago and one of the biggest things I started freaking out about was how I was going to keep paying board.

    Just giving you the reality of such a massive undertaking a horse is. Seriously stick too the lessons and learn the ins and outs of horse care.
     
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  9. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Good points all.

    A. Rose, have you ran through costs? I mean a lease is so much more easy than a purchase. Try looking up costs for a farrier, look up an average vet call plus maintenance such as worming, a seasions worth of ulcer meds? Look up costs on stable blankets/sheets and they need more than one, last one I looked at was over $300. Saddles, good saddles..even used are very expensive. Count on about a $1,000 with bridle..Or just close to it alone. Wraps, boots, different bits, mistakes in tack and having to replace them is there. The list is infinite in a way. Heck the last riding helmet I looked at was close to $500.

    I've not even gotten close to figuring in accidents, illnesses and emergency care. Your talking thousands and thousands. Ughh.

    Considering all, lease is perfect for a new horsewoman. We've a member here that's got a gorgeous mare and is advertising for around $250 I think, but you'd need to be fairly close to the facility. She's gorgeous and well trained, but the member has to have time off with her for some time.

    Maybe think about it, leasing really.. Really is the way to go.
     
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  10. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Personally I don't think seven is "too young", but older and run through tons would be better. I honestly think a lease would better suit a newbie and just left her a post about that. She's a nice looking mare and 14.2, probably was picked because of looks. A horse that size might be a decent fit though. Her expression is good, she doesn't look like a problem, but..She looks very athletic and might be over her head just on that alone.

    Who knows at times. The lease itself makes more sense than purchasing, even better than a "been there used to death" older gelding to me.
     
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