a 'Roarer'?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Stary, Aug 19, 2012.

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  1. Stary

    Stary Full Member

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    So I'm currently looking at horses for sale (my first) and I just saw this 14yo palomino QH gelding in my area that is almost perfect! Only, his owner says he seams to be a "roarer", as in when doing a heavy workout he breaths hard. Does anyone know what this means? Is it something I should be worried about?
     






  2. Isobel

    Isobel Senior Member

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    A roarer has a paralysis of the larynix which means it doesn't work correctly.

    The heavier the horse works, the less oxygen gets in to the blood and fatigue sets in very quickly.

    It depends on what you want from a horse.

    If you're looking for steady trail rides, no problem, If you're looking at doing barrels- run!

    Whatever you do though, get a vet to really look at it in a PPE.
     
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  3. SuZQuzie

    SuZQuzie Senior Member+

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    A roarer is a horse with a paralyzed left laryngeal nerve, causing the arytenoid cartilages to cease to open and close, obstructing the horse's airway to a certain degree. There are different levels of paralysis.

    In most cases, a roarer is happy for middle-level work as long as it doesn't involve medium speed endurance or speed work.
     
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  4. miss machine

    miss machine Senior Member+

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    Yup, what they said. :) What do you plan on doing with the fellow?
     
  5. Stary

    Stary Full Member

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    Trails, jumping, dressage, cross country... Do you think he could do it?

    Is their anything I could do to make riding, especially galloping easier on him?
     
  6. Isobel

    Isobel Senior Member

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    Unfortunately it is there for life. There is no way to ease it. Naturally if your horse is overweight it will put more pressure on lungs etc, and the fitter the horse the better- but you will get to a certain point with your riding daily and in the long run that he will become exhausted and you won't be able to 'fitten' him up and out of him.

    IMO I would say he would make a nice happy hacker- anything more you will struggle with him. However before dismissing him ask the owner, or if you are serious you do it, to get a vet to make sure he is a roarer.

    You can also see yourself. Lunge him from the ground, warm him up as normal, but really really work him. Trot, canter work to make him open those lungs.

    You will hear a 'roar'

    I went to try one out that had been operated on, and they said it was only noticeable in heavy canter work. That was the biggest lie- I really worked the mare and you could hear it in a walk. I ran in the other direction.
     
  7. Stary

    Stary Full Member

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    Ok, thanks for all of the responses! I don't think he is the right horse for me but I am going to look at him and have a vet check him out for sure!
     
  8. miss machine

    miss machine Senior Member+

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    It depends on the severity of the paralysis. Paralysis does worsens with age, so it is a good change that the paralysis is significant. There isn't anything you can do while riding to lessed the severity that I know of.

    I would say with most certainly that cross country would be out of the question. Horses with this issue show decreased performance (and frequently other behavioral problems). I, personally, would not purchased a horse with this issue that I wanted to jump and do cross country with. :(
     
  9. Drafthorse

    Drafthorse Senior Member+

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    You CAN fix roaring with Surgery, but it can be costly.
     
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  10. Isobel

    Isobel Senior Member

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    It can't be 'fixed'.. they open the airway so allow more oxygen in, however this also really increases the risk of food getting in to the lungs. The mare I mentioned had been operated on. Not only that but the operation may also 'fail' and will work for a time and thats it...
     






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