A couple questions

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by crayon, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    You can't just cue this horse and get a reaction..
    You need to start the walk with your body, then cue and keep yourself walking so she has to match your movements. Same with canter; she has to launch into it because you aren't riding it yet.
     
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    crayon Yes, I mentioned I was pretty sure you were just stating common examples. Please forgive me, I'm just in a terrible mood lately. Finally got hired somewhere and THEN all the places I really wanted to work at want to interview me.

    No worries, I know how that can be.

    struggling with figuring out what I want to do with life. I didn't mean to assume that you were assuming things and I value your suggestions very much!

    No worries.

    Yes, I meant that I am careful not to squeeze or kick again and again. :)
    Thank you for answering my question about using the whip! Of course I want her to be responsive to my leg like she should. It was just a problem in the past with her bad reaction to the whip and I didn't know what to do. So I will first try it behind my leg, and try it in other spots if needed, etc.

    It's an imperative thing. Can't do without it. I did in the past, too, want to avoid a confrontation, thought I would get launched. My pony should have worn a tshirt that said 'back off, you know how i can get'. But he was a lot of bluff. When I got after him about it he said, 'aw, come on, why didn't you say so before, I woulda been happy to go along!' LOL. Some of them aren't all bluff...lol....

    Hmm, I've never thought of using something like a heart rate monitor. I'll look into finding one. I bet it would give me some guidance on how in/out of shape she really is.

    I'm getting one for Wuss Horse.

    And I think it's time for a new lunge whip! Mine doesn't actually... make any sound anymore... And honestly I think somebody once told me that you should never touch a horse which the whip, I don't know where, so once I get to the point where she doesn't want to listen, I'm stuck. But you have given me the confidence that it's perfectly ok. It always seemed ok in my mind... better than nagging and nagging until she goes.

    When they won't go there isn't much other choice.

    I honestly think I give too many pre-cues on the lunge line... I use voice, then, a cluck/kiss, then swish the whip, then crack it, if it did that. Thinking about it now that just seems like that is totally ridiculous... I've been spoiled by having a very forward horse for the past year and gotten into such bad habits... I really want to fix it!

    Oh i had that with my mare. You breathe, you think about it, she goes. After her, every other horse seemed like a chore...I was just spoiled, lol.

    Haha, If only I had time in the day to ride her 5 minutes 10 times a day... I bet it would do both of us wonders. I'm about to go out and ride and I'll probably post back here on how things go.

    That's a real trick, to just hop on real quick when they're unfit, make the point, get off.
     
  3. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    If you ride your horse slow with your body and mind, your horse will adjust to your riding speed. The more you nag your horse to go faster the slower she will decide to go. You have to be consistent with the most subtle cues to get a response, which only might last 2 steps, but that is the response you have to accept. If absolutely no response with the most subtle cue then the next least etc.
    The same with lunging your horse. If the horse goes around in the walk let her walk without looking at her,without raising the whip, clucking etc.It has to be her decision to walk,no matter how slow.
    You will notice that with time she will offer a more forward walk .
    My horse was exactly the same in all gaits,until I watched some Parelli Dvd a friend gave me.Yup,now he walks, trotted and canters out nicely without me nagging him.Took a couple months.
     
  4. TBLove

    TBLove Full Member

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    Hi Crayon!

    Forward is great, but forward is NOT fast. Remember, a western pleasure horse can be round, engaged and forward in a very much "slow" JOG. And I'll tell you this, that jog? Takes an incredible amount of LEG , CORE, BALANCE, SUPPLENESS, and absolutely, has ZERO to do with hand or rein length.:)
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Nnnnnn....not exactly. What is considered to be 'forward' in one riding sport is just way too slow for other riding sports.

    There is an element of speed in forward as well, in sports where the horse is simply expected to cover more ground faster.
     
  6. crayon

    crayon Senior Member

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    I bet what Crayon is doing would be perfect for Western Pleasure. For classical English riding or huntseat, not at all. Perhaps I should pick a different discipline haha. Just kidding. ^^

    slc, That's exactly how I'm feeling lately. Spoiled by that other horse. Crayon is my first horse, but I realize now how we were both really burnt out before I moved away. I constantly had to struggle to get her to go unless I rode her the way she wanted me to. Certain things would make her trot faster, but nothing would help that walk. I'm finding myself really missing my second horse because it was so easy to get into a routine of riding every day because it was only fun and not a struggle. I would be patient with things she was unsure about, and in return she would always be ready to go and even more willing to try new things. It's kind of sad because I really want to have that with Crayon... I just don't know how to. That's why I reeeaallly want to fix this!

    The ride yesterday went alright. It was actually only about 5 minutes because some kids from next door stopped by to see Crayon and I think it was a good stopping point. Just holding a dressage whip made a difference in her walk. However no matter how sharply I applied it, I couldn't get her to jump forward or speed up. She did sometimes kind of meander into a trot which I still took as a good (I think?) sign. I let her keep trotting because I didn't want her to think leg-whip doesn't mean go... But I'd rather she walk faster than trot because the trot is not an issue. It still seems like she is getting a tiny bit more responsive and willing to move with every ride, but I want to make sure I'm doing everything I can to help her improve. Unfortunately it's sleeting today. :( Maybe I can hop back on tomorrow.
     
  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I had a horse that did the Crayon thing for years. Five minutes with a good instructor telling me what to do sorted it out for the rest of his life. You just have to be very quick and very obvious. It is very important to reward ANY more forward motion, no matter what gait it is in. Be very sure you're off his mouth completely, don't even worry about contact for a second. Just yeehaa forward in any gait. You use your legs once and then instantly go for your whip if you don't have a snap-your-neck response instantly.
     
  8. TBLove

    TBLove Full Member

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    The idea that forward means faster is very very incorrect sadly. While the general idea is correct, the application is in fact wrong here. You obviously cannot do a cross country course without moving forward of course - but you cannot do it with without impulsion, balance, and rhythm either. Never once will "speed" determine whether a horse is truly moving forward off your leg. Forward as a whole does NOT mean quicker no matter what type of saddle you ride in.
    Forward, Impulsion, pace, stride length, and rhythm are all separate entities and at least where I live is the same across many disciplines. Covering more ground means a lengthened stride, which increases the pace, and correlates with forward, but also transitioning from a gallop to a halt is FORWARD as well. In a correct trot to extended trot for example the pace and rhythm doesn't change, but the stride length does, and therefore the horse covers more ground and appears "quicker".

    Always back to front in Every discipline. Forward and In front of the leg VS "moving quickly" are VERY different, and yes of course very pace and gait and type of riding can have issues with both.
    I have ridden hunters, jumpers, 4th level dressage through to I1 with some GP dressage, gaited horses, and western horses. I have shown western, hunter, jumper, dressage, and in-hand and in-cart heavy horses. Trust me when I say forward doesn't mean faster, you can have a horse galloping away with you very fast and moving forward, but that doesn't mean hes truly forward off you leg does it!
     
  9. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    YES! As is backing up, which people often forget (or never realize).
     
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  10. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Truth
     
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