*8/24 Update!* Oh Please Dont Let It Be That

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by BigDreamsRanch, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. BigDreamsRanch

    BigDreamsRanch Senior Member+

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    *We have a vet appointment for tomorrow*

    On Sunday I noticed some swelling behind Rose's jaw. I immediately freaked, fear of it being strangles. As of today is doesn't appear to have grown any thankfully. I've done tons of research and other than the swelling is is exhibiting no other symptoms. She downs her food, is drinking plenty of water, is alert, clean nose and is even kicking up her heels in her stall a bit. What could this be? She hasn't been worked for over 3 weeks so could it be excess fat?

    Also while doing the research I noticed that it could be contagious to humans. Is this true? I haven't heard such a thing. Is strangles similar to the strep throat that humans get?


    * I dont board my horses and neither horse has had contact with any other horses for the past 15 weeks. I did go to a traning facility about 8 days ago though but I dont remember touching any horses. *



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    Also the vet will be re-xraying Rose's side-bone to determine why she is still sore. She has been officially out of full work for over 15 weeks(except for the 3 days of riding after her last vet check). If the side-bone is still fractured then we will be blocking the nerve, which means another 5 weeks off. Her show career for the rest of this year is over. This horse lives to bewilder us.:no:
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2012






  2. bnttyra

    bnttyra Senior Member+

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    It could be many things, and strangles isn't a death notice either. I had my first horse that I bought by myself get strangles as a yearling, never got really sick, just had a nasty gross goo come out of the wound.

    Hopefully your vet can figure out what is going on! It must suck to have her still be sore after all this time.

    Where would she have been exposed to strangles? Any new horses at the place you board?
     
  3. BigDreamsRanch

    BigDreamsRanch Senior Member+

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    I realize that its not a death sentence. Only 2% of horses die from the illness and that's if there not treated. It would just be another set back and if my dad's horse gets it "we" could be in big trouble because his horse is extremely shy of people and you can hardly touch him.

    Yeah its been a real pain. One moment she fine and then the next she is sore. :(

    I dont board my horses, they live in my backyard. Neither horse has had contact with any other horses for the past 15 weeks. I did go to a traning facility about 8 days ago though but I dont remember touching any horses.
     
  4. bnttyra

    bnttyra Senior Member+

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    More than likely it isn't strangles, maybe she just bumped herself some how. And there really isn't any treatment per se, just keeping any open wounds clean and letting it drain and then to disinfect the area. We had my filly get it as well as a 20ish yr old horse and both were fine, it was years ago and there was a strangles type vaccine but if i remember correct, they can still get it like with WNV, just not maybe as bad. Plus Rose has probably already been exposed to it which makes it much less likely.


    Gosh, I hope they figure out what is wrong with her and why she can't stay sound.
     
  5. BigDreamsRanch

    BigDreamsRanch Senior Member+

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    That's what I'm hoping. I just really don't want her to go through that right now. Knowing her its quite possible that she just bummed herself, it just was in a rather weird area so I was worried. Considering Rose's previous life, before being rescued, its very possible that she has already gotten it. The way she was treated(or lack there-of really) was horrendous.

    Here's the story on the soundness problem summed up to the best of my ability:

    On May 12th I noticed that she was limping at a horse show. So we scratched her and had a vet come out to West World to look at her. He couldn't do x-rays there but we set a day for him to some out. That Monday he came out, took xrays, etc. The x-rays showed that everything was in perfect condition except for her side-bone which was fractured in two areas. We decided(as a group) to give her 5 weeks off and then have the vet come back out to look at her. Fast forward 6 weeks(he was busy on week 5). He came out, had me lung her, her looked her all over and told me that she appears to be 100% sound but he didn't want to take x-rays again until her was back in work. So I was given orders to begin light work and in 2 weeks he would come back out. I also stated that the farrier would be coming out in two weeks as well and if it would be ok to re-shoe her, he said yes. She stayed 100% sound throughout those two weeks even when I increased the work quite a bit. We had the farrier come out to re-shoe her because I figured that she was going to stay sound and I wouldn't have to pull her sliders and put on regular shoes. He came out and due to me waiting(my fault 100% and I regret it) she was long in the toe. It didn't help that she pulled three of the four shoes two days before. He trimmed her down to almost normal and put new shoes on. I knew that she would be sore and sure enough she was. I gave her a week off and began to work her again. She worked great so I spent the next 4 days just lunging her. Still looking good. I decided to ride her one day and as soon as I asked her to move forward she hesitated. This mare NEVER hesitates when something is asked from her. That was my first clue. I then asked for a trot to see how she moved. It was obvious that she was still sore. So I stopped her and got off, unsaddled her, and went home. I called up the farrier and vet and told them the situation the vet said to have the farrier come back out and give her another week off. The next day the farrier came out(great friend and knows exactly what he's doing) and took a look at her. He had me lung her and he checked her pulse in her legs, did the hoof tester, etc. He agreed with the vet to give her a week off. So that I did. The next week I took her out and did some light lunging. She looked great. Fast foreword 4 days. She's still going good so I decide to tack her up and ride around a bit. I warmed her up really well, did some lateral movements, etc and then asked for a trot........she was STILL limping at the trot. I got off and un-tacked her, gave her a "bath" and let her dry. By this point her hooves are grown out to were they should be, so that's not the problem. Fast foreword another 3 weeks(during this time I was trying to get a hold of the vet). I decided to see if she was still sore. Sure enough she was and this time on the lung line as well. I called up the vet ASAP and thankfully he answered and will be coming out sometime tomorrow.

    We think that unknowingly the farrier might have re-injured her by re-shoeing her. The pounding in the nail might have re-fractured it. Now this is in no way the farriers fault. I told him well in advance that she was injured recently and as soon as he came that day he asked which leg it was, wear, how bad, etc. So I told him the whole story. Our farrier is amazing and we "love" him so very much. He pretty much saved Rose's life because when I got her her hooves were a train-wreck.
     
  6. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member+

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    Do you feed grass hay? If not, does your alfalfa maybe have a little bit of foxtail in it? If she's out on pasture at all, is there foxtail or any other similar grasses out there?

    I had a mare do that once. It was a seed head that had irritated her. It went away on its own, but I freaked... thinking it was strangles.

    There was an article in Equus last month or the month before about two fillies with the same issue.

    If your horse doesn't have a temp, I'd not worry so much about strangles. PM LopinSlow; her babies have had strangles all summer, and she's well versed in dealing with it.

    Being that Rose is a show horse, she's probably been exposed to it.

    Also, I don't think a horse should ever be sore after a trim or reset. Mine never are. One other thing... lunging can be hard on a horse. That wouldn't be my choice for "light" exercise. It is hard on joints.
     
  7. bay_blnd jmpr07

    bay_blnd jmpr07 Senior Member+

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    Is it painful? Does she have a fever?

    My mare either got a spider bite or a splinter halfway between her jaw and throatlatch area. She was haltered easily but when the cross tie was beng put on the person bumped her right on the spot and she buckled to her knees. She had a fever and the barn put her on bute, called the vet and then called me (she was on lease and they knew either way she would be seen at their expense).

    Even with bute in her system she had a fever. I had to hotpack the area (the barn did mornings and I did evenings). She was put on antibiotics. She was better within a week. It was a little scary. This was a mare with a pretty high pain tolerance. Very stoic (she jumped with a significally sore back without complaint...didn't I feel like a bad owner after that lesson!).
     
  8. bay_blnd jmpr07

    bay_blnd jmpr07 Senior Member+

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    I think it depends on the horse and the size of the "circle". If you can lunge using the whole arena and the horse is quiet, I find that ok (that was part of rehabbing my gelding after hock surgery). The bigger the "circle" the better.
     
  9. ChestersMomma

    ChestersMomma Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    My horse gave me a 'strangles scare' similar to this. Turned out to be a splinter. He loves rubbing his head/neck on trees and wood posts and we ended up pulling about a 2 cm splinter out from behind his jowl. It had swollen just right to imitate a strangles lump.
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member+

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    I agree with tlwidener on this one. No longeing for horses with any lameness, joint pain or other discomforts.
     






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