2 months??

Discussion in 'Horse Rescue / Adoption' started by mygurlDestiny, Apr 20, 2017.

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  1. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    During the recession. I chose to not breed my own mares, and instead took in some young horses who's owners could no longer care for them. I have several friends that did the same. My trainer took in many, but one in particular was a 1. So I have actually had 1st hand experience and have seen others close up. In my experience it takes about a year to get a young hot blood horse from a 2 back to a 5. It took about 2 years for the trainer and then the horse new owner to get him from a 1 to a 5. This is with free choice Timothy, alfalfa and senior feed.

    It takes almost the fist month to get them built up to a proper diet. Horses that are down like this in the winter are hard to bring up because they burn so much for heat. Young horses are still growing and nutrition will go to the growth. Many hot bloods take far more calories than cold /warm bloods. TBs are notorious for being hard to build back up.

    The Rescue or legal owner of this horse did not post these pictures, I doubt that there was permission to post them. The Rescue did not put this horse in this state. For all we know the horse was full of ulcers and worms on top of the starvation. The horse is gaining weight and is in a healthy looking environment. I see no wrong doing on the rescues part . I would be very careful not to turn this into a witch hunt.
     
  2. mygurlDestiny

    mygurlDestiny Full Member

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    I've seen it first hand.. Animal Control obviously trusts them or they wouldn't have given the horse to them, or so I'd hope
     
  3. mygurlDestiny

    mygurlDestiny Full Member

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    Like I said before, blood tests showed she was perfectly healthy, no ulcers, no worms, nothing wrong, just didn't get the proper amount of feed.. Thank you I've never been big in thoroughbreds, I like to watch racing and whatnot and I know their metabolism is fast but I didn't think about it affecting her weight gain. I'm not turning this into anything I just wanted to see from other horse lovers point of view if she's doing alright as I don't trust the rescue. Again thank you
     
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  4. mygurlDestiny

    mygurlDestiny Full Member

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    I would adopt her but sadly with work I've been moving states a lot and that's not the life for a horse :( Thank you!
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    It's not a 'fast metabolism' - and this may sound like splitting hairs, but basically, they've been bred to 'put it in their legs, not their backsides'. In other words, when you feed them more, a higher percentage of that is expended in activity, than with other horses.

    As an example, say I feed my Belgian-Quarter Horse-Morgan-Haflinger, Twinkletoes, extra feed. He's going to wind up looking like a gigantic meatloaf, and he's going to be pretty stationary. And if I do that to my Thoroughbred, Max Speed, Max'll be running laps around the field, instead. And not getting quite as fat as Twinkletoes.

    Twinkletoes will be standing there with a hunk of feed in his mouth, watching the Thb tear around, and saying, 'What is WRONG with that boy?'
     
  6. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    Her teeth could be in terrible shape where simple floating won't make a difference.
    Horses need to settle in which can take a few weeks to months depending on their personality.
    Some horses worry more are anxious thus burning precious energy so weight gain is slow.
    My rescue was underweight and it took him about 6 month to be not a Skinner anymore.
    Please be very careful about a rescue.Unless you see real neglect,unsafe pastures,not enough hay in storage,no farrier or vet care,no fresh clean water and all other horses are skinny even they have been there for a while.
    Think about that they are helping animals in need.Are they adopting out horses with a high dollar amount? That would be a flag to me.Are there people that foster any of those horses?
    Do they have an evaluation done of the horse and have a trainer on hand to retrain the horses?
    What exactly is the reason that you don't trust that rescue.Is it based on assumption or actual facts?
    Not knowing about TBs and their metabolism etc then assuming the horse isn't fed enough might just be an assumption.
     
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  7. CoffeeBean

    CoffeeBean Senior Member

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    Well, I'm sorry you can't get her at this time but I hope you are still able to get some time with horses wherever you go. I was out fooling with my senior citizens and trying not to think too hard about their ages. *sighs*
     
  8. mygurlDestiny

    mygurlDestiny Full Member

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    I've seen neglect. I've watched her sell horses to slaughter. And I've watched her put down a perfectly good horse because they didn't have the room. I refused to volunteer. A friend of mine did, very close almost family, and she watched as they forced the horses into trailers by animal control just days after they got there and were told they were going to be rehabilitated and when asked about the horses she refuses to answer. I am not assuming anything. I do know that some horses have went there been rehabilitated sent to a trainer and resold to happy families. But some have not. I am worried for the well being of a young throughrbed that I personally knew. She was in perfect health when she got there no ulcers, teeth had been recently done, feet were shoed, etc, she just didn't get enough grociers ecpecially for just coming off the track.
     
  9. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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    -But that would be a different horse. This one was not 'in perfect health' on arrival.

    Some horses have a 'physical depression' after they come off the track: getting any drugs out of their system and re-cycling from a high adrenalin-kick lifestyle. Which means they may look scruffy or fail to gain for a bit of time. Then they bounce back strongly if well fed, exercised, vet and dental and farrier done and they have good handlers and a consistent routine.

    There are rescues that hold back feed or feed less concentrates when there has been a seizure with pending court cases: the court needs the animal to NOT quickly get healthy and slick.

    So some horses will get back to shape in 2 months of great care if they were short term short rations but basically in good shape before the groceries went away; others may take 6 months to a year if they have been malnourished for long periods and have massive medical issues and internal organ damage.

    Spring shed happens and makes horses look motheaten if they were down in condition for long periods (they often grow a much longer than normal winter coat because their body is trying to reduce heat loss.) - these rarely shed quickly and look faded and patchy for some time.
     
  10. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    Here is the realty... lets look at Dogs and Cats as they are well documented. 56% of dogs and 71% of cats that are sent to Animal Shelters are Euthanized. This is done because sometimes it is the most humane outcome for the animal. sometimes they have issues that make them unadoptable, and sometimes there just rent enough homes or money. Is this the Shelters fault? , no. It is the fault of the people who bred or did not care for animals that they were responsible for.

    A rescue is not a bad rescue for euthanizing a horse that can not be made whole or adopted out. Rescues have decide which horses can be rehomed and which they can not save. Rescues do charge an adoption fee which usually does not even cover the cost of the animals rehabilitation, this money allows them to help the next horse.

    Rescues that work closely with Animal Control, and animal control will document the animals care and progress for the court.

    If you have an issue with this Rescue than you need to address it with the authorities like the Sheriff and Animal control.

    I am much more concerned with the behaviors of the person who used this horse for business on the track and then tossed her aside an then neglected her than I am about the rescue that has managed to put weight on her.
     
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